Pretty Southern

What does it mean to be a Southerner in the 21st century?

Words Only Southerners Say

Before we get to our favorite words only Southerners say, let’s hear it from the famous belles of
“Sh%t Southern Women Say” on The Southern Women Channel.

Down here, there is no Pepsi. Everything is Coke. Even Pepsi is called Coke. True Southerners don’t like going North because up there, if you ask for Coke, all y’all get is freaking Pepsi.

In Northern states, iced tea is served with a box of sugar packets because Yankees are too lazy to actually blend sugar into the hot liquid to make sweet tea. Damn Yankees.

Life below the Mason Dixon line is so sweet, just like our tea and Coca-Cola. Southern accents over time have developed their own vocabulary. These words tend to come out with even more zest if the Southerner has been drinking bourbon.

Here’s a sampling of words only Southerners say

Y’all: it’s never “you guys” but “y’all”. We’ll know you’re a Yankee, or that your parents were Yankees, if you say “you guys”.

Fixin’ to: used to let your compatriot know what’s up. As in “I’m fixin’ to make me a drink”

Lagniappe: a little bit of something extra (especially for those form N’Awlins and the Gulf area)

Pocketbook: girls from the deep South’s middle-o’-nowhere areas are known to call it this instead of a purse.

Mash: Southerners don’t push things, we mash ‘em.

Po’Boy: a long sandwich, usually served with fried oysters, shrimp or fish. But in NOLA, your po’boy could even have plain deli meat. Po’Boys are really defined by their good, long crusty bread.

Buggy: it’s not a shopping cart, but a buggy

Might Could: a polite way of presenting your options

Caddywompus a.k.a. caddywonked: a more fun way to say sideways

Access Road a.k.a. Main Road: screw the term “service road”. If the D.O.T. is working on the highway, there’s only one road to get back on your route again and it’s via an “access road” or “main road”. And by the way, if you live in the South, that construction is going to take five years just to pave two lanes. Especially if it’s I-75 in Georgia or Florida. Same thing for I-85 in the Carolinas. Because of this tragic lack of getting the roads fixed, Southerners do not call our interstates “freeways” but “highways”. There’s nothing free about our highways (see GA-400).

Sweeper: as in run the sweeper referring to the vacuum

Made: whether you’re referring to a test you aced, a photo you took, or a baby you birthed, “made” is the verb

Changer or Clicker: you want me to pass you what? A remote control? Honey, that thing is called the changer or the clicker. There’s no controlling the remote in a Southern house. That darn thing will cause World War III, ‘specially in SEC football season.

Yankee: anyone from the North. Even if you’re from Washington D.C., you’re a borderline Yankee. But stay here long enough, plant some roots, and you’ll grow up to become a Southerner.

“Bless Your Heart”: if you’ve heard this, especially from a Southern woman, she doesn’t mean it. It’s her nice way of telling you to put on your grown up pants and deal with it. As said by one of our New York friends “I could shout a parade of Yankee-style expletives in your face and it wouldn’t be nearly as bitchy as bless your heart.”

What are some of your favorite words only Southerners say? Y’all can comment below.

393 Comments on Words Only Southerners Say

  1. Sara
    June 29, 2011 at 10:09 am (3 years ago)

    My Yankee relatives make fun of me and my sisters any time we drop the ‘g’ off of words, like ‘fixin’ and ‘puddin’. Also, I don’t know if “Dumb as a box of rocks” is only a Southern saying, but I had a college roommate from South Georgia who used it all the time.

    Reply
    • Kd
      January 22, 2013 at 6:27 am (2 years ago)

      Ha. Yea. That’s a south Georgia sayin. I live in south GA and I don’t recall hearIn it anywhere else.

      Reply
      • Shy
        March 11, 2013 at 9:47 pm (2 years ago)

        I’m not sure if it’s just Georgia. My family says it all the time and I’m from Wisconsin…

        Reply
        • jim
          February 27, 2014 at 9:32 pm (10 months ago)

          I’m from North Carolina and I’ve always used it. That being said, I also used to live in Savannah so i might’ve picked it up down there.

          Reply
        • Rebecca
          April 15, 2014 at 9:19 pm (8 months ago)

          I live in northwest Indiana a half hour from Chicago and my mom says dumb as a box of rocks. My family has always lived in the north with no southern ties at all.

          Reply
      • Zacha
        March 14, 2013 at 9:48 pm (2 years ago)

        We use it in tx too lol

        Reply
        • TA
          April 23, 2014 at 10:16 pm (8 months ago)

          Im from Tennessee and I have trouble hearing the difference between TX and TN accents.

          Reply
          • Hannah
            July 17, 2014 at 8:02 pm (5 months ago)

            I’m from Louisiana and I can hear some differences between TX and TN accents. In my opinion, TX has thicker, deeper accents with more throaty drawls. TN is a bit lighter with wider syllables.

      • KC
        March 27, 2013 at 11:36 pm (2 years ago)

        I live in south Georgia, and I’ve never heard that saying.

        Reply
        • Tyler 123
          April 27, 2013 at 10:49 am (2 years ago)

          I’m from Arkansas, and we say, “you’re dumber than a box of rocks”. It’s an all around Southern saying. I usually don’t talk Southern, though. Unless it’s something like, y’all, or dumber than a box of rocks. :)

          Reply
          • Leo
            November 12, 2013 at 12:03 pm (1 year ago)

            Down here in Tennessee not only do we say “Dumber than a box of rocks” we add in “Ain’t worth two dead flies”. Just sayin’

          • Kinsey
            December 19, 2013 at 4:20 am (1 year ago)

            We say that here In M.T. My mama grew up in south Georgia. Moved to Arkansas. She always said “Now don’t come to me and be, dumber then a box of rocks.”

      • BKT
        April 26, 2013 at 11:28 pm (2 years ago)

        Not just a south GA thing, We say up here in Ol’ Kentucky too!!!

        Reply
      • Matthew
        July 4, 2013 at 11:07 pm (1 year ago)

        I don’t know about you guys, but we say some of these words up in Pittsburgh. Such as buggy and clicker. I think that might be it though.

        Reply
      • JW
        August 13, 2013 at 9:14 am (1 year ago)

        Not just a Southern saying. We use it in S.D. as well.

        Reply
      • Jon
        August 19, 2013 at 1:39 pm (1 year ago)

        How about this southern saying: We just am plain dumb down in these here parts?

        Reply
        • Clay
          April 14, 2014 at 3:02 pm (8 months ago)

          Way to show your ass! At least we know how to drive correctly.

          Reply
          • Laurie
            June 12, 2014 at 11:56 pm (6 months ago)

            “Oh, honey” is a good beginning for every sentence in the South. It’s kind of like beginning to tear someone up, but with love.

          • emily
            June 19, 2014 at 9:37 am (6 months ago)

            Ya. I live in the north but only my dad’s side is northern. My roots are southern. I use oh honey a lot to the beggin of my sentences. But I hate it when guys think I’m flirtin with them.

        • Pierce
          September 5, 2014 at 6:55 pm (4 months ago)

          Just because we don’t feel so insecure as to want to use higher tier vocabulary to feel self-important doesn’t mean we’re any less intelligent than you Northern folk, Jon.

          Reply
      • Janelle
        September 2, 2013 at 6:51 pm (1 year ago)

        I live in Ohio and hear people say it all the time, so I don’t think that’s really something that’s strictly Southern.

        Reply
    • Dana
      June 19, 2013 at 11:12 am (2 years ago)

      We use the saying “dumber than a box of rocks” in Missouri.

      Reply
      • Cortney
        December 16, 2013 at 5:06 pm (1 year ago)

        Southern people are so arrogant.

        Reply
        • Gretchen
          July 30, 2014 at 10:37 am (5 months ago)

          if by ‘arrogant’, you mean ‘awesome’, well, my dear…..you’re right! Bless your heart! ;)

          Reply
          • annie
            November 18, 2014 at 8:54 pm (1 month ago)

            Darlin we are awesome and you are not arrogant, you are ignorant.

        • hollie
          October 8, 2014 at 6:17 pm (2 months ago)

          oh honey notherners are so full of them self people should not make fun of our accent

          Reply
    • Daddy Yankee
      July 1, 2013 at 5:55 am (1 year ago)

      Southerners once again proving they are, in fact, dumber than a box of rocks. It’s an American saying, idiots.

      Reply
      • South Will Rise 'gain
        July 27, 2013 at 6:07 am (1 year ago)

        Yankee, on a southern page? Get yo yankee ass back across the Mason Dixon before the south gets hold of u and stomps a hole in your yankee ways. I hate the north, and dont forget, WE GONNA RISE AN DO IT GAIN!

        Reply
        • georgia_redneck
          August 14, 2013 at 10:56 pm (1 year ago)

          shit your right this aint where a yankee belongs time to get the ol’ double barrel out again and the south never fell its always been better than tha north

          Reply
          • Kinsey
            December 19, 2013 at 4:24 am (1 year ago)

            I’m from the north. My mamas from the south. I like south better then the north. I rather not be A yankee.

        • Pat McGroin
          August 19, 2013 at 1:46 pm (1 year ago)

          Y’allz never rose before… y’allz lost before… Duuuh

          Reply
          • Phil Hacio
            August 19, 2013 at 1:48 pm (1 year ago)

            Dem toothless good ole boys in pickups is gonna wup yer hides agin, y’all! Oh wait, I forgot, the redneckers lost that war.

          • Kitten Head
            February 12, 2014 at 3:23 pm (10 months ago)

            Hey Pat! Theres no such word as y’allz. Why dont you go piss up a rope!

          • gaboy
            June 7, 2014 at 3:57 am (7 months ago)

            The south only LOST cuz we ran outta bullets. But just remember, not all of us gave up. Sick em hairy dawgs

          • kat
            November 1, 2014 at 8:39 pm (2 months ago)

            OK Pat…the correct spelling is YAĹL..not yálz…so DUHHHH back at ya.

            And by yaĺl winning, look where that got us……ferguson, OJ…

        • bornayankee
          November 6, 2013 at 9:21 am (1 year ago)

          yea okay?? when will that be? Im on here to figure out what you people trying to say cause again as you put it “ya’ll got no sense!”

          Reply
          • jaimie
            November 27, 2013 at 5:07 am (1 year ago)

            It was the government. The south had all the cotton. Cotton could not grow in the north, government was the cause of civil war. Not slavery or racism the ggovernment reaped the benefits of the cotton which was the major crop and was exported across seas and taxed the govt essentially ended up pitting the north and the south against each other. And yes iI am from south Carolina however have lived up north and you are damn Yankees very cold hearts selfish your women look ugly and take no pride in themselves running round looking like bums. This was about southern sayings until u Yankees came and started trouble…typical. y’all have a way different aspect on life and when I lived there y’all all were strange ass hell. But do not get on here on down us southerners because this just gives us reason further to dislike y’all…HELLO dumbys.

        • DaniAlabama
          December 10, 2013 at 12:24 am (1 year ago)

          You forgot to say we were gonna stomp a mud hole in ‘em. That’s purdy southern for ya.

          Reply
        • Jerry
          January 5, 2014 at 6:32 pm (12 months ago)

          Yankee told me the South lost the Civil War…get over it…I boxed him in the nose and said….We have yet begin to fight!

          Reply
          • Tay-Tay
            May 21, 2014 at 8:15 pm (7 months ago)

            some people in the south are very happy the south lost.

        • kj
          May 30, 2014 at 8:58 am (7 months ago)

          Do what again? We lost. The Yanks kicked our #$ses. Besides, this is the internet. Put it out there and the whole world gets to read and reply. Not a Yankee

          Reply
        • Up north
          June 4, 2014 at 5:16 am (7 months ago)

          I was raised in michigan, but lived in georgia for a few yrs. I was in basic classes up there in school, but when i moved down south I was 2 grades ahead of my normal grade. I met more dumb ppl down there than i care to say. But we beat up some ignorant skin heads at the arcade and ripped their old confederate flag off and burned it in front of them bird brain idiots. That was my best memory of being surrounded by southern uneducated rednecks

          Reply
          • gaboy
            June 7, 2014 at 4:04 am (7 months ago)

            Not all of us are uneducated. I speak 5 languages. The reason I keep my hair close is because it’s freaking hot. Oh and I have a college education. I moved my kids up north for one year, they breezed thru that year. When we came back they were behind almost two years. I’ve met dumb Yankees and dumb respects.only thing that stays true is that y’all damn yankees wouldn’t know how to play football if your life depended on it

          • Gretchen
            July 30, 2014 at 10:40 am (5 months ago)

            Bless your heart. ;)

          • rollingsixxes
            July 30, 2014 at 6:08 pm (5 months ago)

            So you beat them up and burned their flag? That was your best memory? That sounds real sick and twisted. Keep your Yankee Piece of Shit Ass up there in Michigan. You Yanks call us ignorant and racists? Your behavior is exactly what you spout against. FUCK YOUR HYPOCRISY. We don’t need your shit down here. Stay up there and pray a REAL Skinhead doesn’t beat your ass. (for your information real Skins are racists at all). You supposedly beat up some Neo-Nazi Skins and no body likes them anyways. Talk about uneducated!

          • Ken
            September 6, 2014 at 3:17 pm (4 months ago)

            THe reason our schools are so screwed up down here is because the federal government wanted to make it easier so the blacks could make better grades. They are still doing it and have been at it for 40 years so that’s why our kids don’t know who Audie Murphy is but know who Jesse Jackson is. I was in the army witH you smart ass Yankees and jerked a knot in a couple of your tails. We don’t care how you did it up north but wish you’d stay up there. I ve got a neighbor from New York who don’t have a clue on yard work because he never had a yard before . He culitIvates poke salet and thinks crab grass is lovely when you cut it every month. Yankees are dumb as a stump

          • annie
            November 18, 2014 at 8:59 pm (1 month ago)

            I think you are full of shit yank. There as many dumb asses in the north as any where.

      • KP
        July 27, 2013 at 10:36 pm (1 year ago)

        Bless your heart.

        Reply
      • madi
        August 9, 2013 at 5:49 pm (1 year ago)

        Bless your heart, sugar.
        I swear to the mighty lord above, damn yank, i will shoot you if you don’t get off our land. Why couldn’t yall just have left us alone all those years ago? We were better than you, you cold hearted yanks. I hope you freeze your ass off next winter up there!

        Reply
        • Midwesterner
          August 10, 2013 at 10:35 am (1 year ago)

          Be warned, another Yankee here. I’m researching southern culture to legitimize a character in a story I’m writing.

          1. The internet is public domain. It’s nonsensicasl to

          Reply
        • Janelle
          September 2, 2013 at 6:59 pm (1 year ago)

          When I heard stories of some Southerners still being upset about the Civil War I never really believed it until now. I’m not sure how you can say that the South was better when in fact they lost. I do not have any sort of problem with the South or the people living there, but in saying that north was in the wrong for fighting for equality I simply cannot agree.

          Reply
          • eden
            September 14, 2013 at 12:38 pm (1 year ago)

            Just so you all know, I am from Mississippi and the south was just like the north we won some and lost some. Those barefoot toothless moonshiners kick the Britishes buts at Kings Mountain. They were volunteers. And if the south is so bad why is it the northers are still enjoying things southerners invented? Air conditioners and the refrigerator systems were invented by a southern Doctor from Florida, Shipping containers were invented by a southerner and wreckers were also. How would the northerners like to do without one of those when they get stuck, Jack Daniels whiskey was invented by a southerner. Wonder where the north would be without our inventions and the Civil war was not fought over equality it was fought over economics, freeing those from slavery was just a by product. So get your history right. Do your research. You yankees were just jealous of what we had.You couldn’t make it yourself so you came to steal it from southerners.

          • Bontemps
            November 4, 2013 at 10:49 pm (1 year ago)

            Honey the war was not about slavery. It was about us southerners wanting to form our own country seperate from y’all. Do some research. We aren’t as dumb as we must sound to you. What do you not agree with. I’m for equality. But before you judge the South, get your facts straight. They teach what they want u to know in school but I’m sure you can search the web or hit up the good ole fashion library.

          • Jerry
            January 5, 2014 at 6:38 pm (12 months ago)

            It is really very simple why there was a Civil war. States Right. Pure and simple. Nothing else.The South wanted to do what they wanted and The Union wanted the South to do what they wanted.

          • Hannah
            July 17, 2014 at 8:18 pm (5 months ago)

            Um, yes, the war was about states’ rights, in those states’ rights, slavery was included. So, I don’t think you can separate slavery, states’ rights, and the war.

            And unfortunately, yes, some people in the south are upset about the Civil War, which is counterproductive. It’d be better to let go and move on to bigger and better accomplishments.

        • Jbella
          September 12, 2013 at 7:07 pm (1 year ago)

          Damn so much anger for ppl u don’t even know! I grew up in WI visited family in TX every summer so I love the south! Why worry about what happened all them years ago? And u make no sense when you refer to the “yanks” as being cold-hearted when really it was the southern racist ways that were cold-hearted. Again that was way too long ago for me to care, I love the whole country, just had to make the point that you sound “dumber than a box of rocks” ;) god bless

          Reply
          • Okay
            February 6, 2014 at 2:11 am (11 months ago)

            Hey Billy Bob: We have some of the finest universities in the country. And if yakees hate it here so much, why are they moving here? IN DROVES? Also, to those above the Mason-Dixon: Please don’t continue to fool yourselves into thinking your ancestors had nothing to do with slavery. What a LAUGH! The LARGEST slave market in the US was in Bristol, Rhode Island. LOTS of northern whites enslaved African human beings. It was NOT just in the south.

          • G.R.I.T.S.
            March 10, 2014 at 2:43 am (10 months ago)

            Texas is in the Midwest, dear….

          • G.R.I.T.S.
            March 10, 2014 at 2:47 am (10 months ago)

            “Jbella”…
            I’m born and raised in the south and I’m not racist….I think everyone should own 2 or 3 of ‘em ;)

      • Billee-Bob
        August 19, 2013 at 1:41 pm (1 year ago)

        Of course thir dummer in the south… they only believes in da baable… any other lernin’ book, like science and what feer, to a southerner is seenonomous with kommunizm.

        Reply
        • Cassie
          August 30, 2013 at 7:13 pm (1 year ago)

          Who’s more dumb? The South? Or the person who can’t spell anything?

          Reply
          • Matt
            September 3, 2013 at 2:24 pm (1 year ago)

            At first, I believed the spelling was atrocious, however, re-reading it showed me it was more mockery than anything. Rude… I’m from New York, and still find it rude.

        • Christina
          September 6, 2013 at 3:17 pm (1 year ago)

          Look, I do not understand why you have a problem with the south. I am from the south and I find myself and many others to be more intelligent than you. No one in the south thinks that everything is communism, that the Bible is the only thing worth reading, or that science is of the devil. I do not know where you, the biggest moron from the North, got your information, but I am sorry to inform you that you are incorrect. I hope that you further educate yourself and know that all because you have these misconceptions, that I can see where you are coming from. Quite frankly, I know that their are some rednecks that do hang a rebel flag off their trucks or outside their houses, but they do not use it as a representation of the Confederacy, but as a symbol that they have pride in their heritage. Even though the North sees the rebel flag as a symbol of racism and rebellion, it is in fact a sign of knowing their roots and the truth that you seem to not have obtained.

          Reply
          • gaboy
            June 7, 2014 at 4:14 am (7 months ago)

            Aman. Sister

          • Sal
            July 20, 2014 at 1:35 pm (5 months ago)

            Beg your pardon. It’s spelled: “Amen” :-P

        • Bontemps
          November 4, 2013 at 11:05 pm (1 year ago)

          Funny u say that. My kid has an iq higher than you. He’s in in the 99.9th percentile and he’s 4. Also, there is another young 4yr old who is smarter than you that you can see by googleing 4yr old mensa. What we believe in is Southern hospitality. Waving to your neighbor, hugging ppl actually caring even if it means less for you. We don’t stress ourselves to death. We drink and figure it out. We embrace or culture and are proud of where we came from. We aren’t the racist u think, some are but that’s not just south and not just black n white. We have a way of life that may seem odd but I’m cajun and its funny when Yankees freak bc the boiled shrimp has a head on it and when they see boudin or crawfish or raw oyters. It’s comments like yours that make me feel sorry for you. You sound like you have never experienced the South yet decided to judge. Whose really the racist?

          Reply
        • Victoria
          March 20, 2014 at 9:51 am (9 months ago)

          Oh Please, this is completely ridiculous. First of all, there is no need to make fun of people. Second, people are entitled to Religious Freedom, if they wish to read the Bible and be God-fearing christian in the South that is none of ANYONE’s business. Next, I refuse to believe you actually think that just because people live in the South you are actually less educated than others; I’ll have you know that school’s like Duke, Washington University in St. Louis, Vanderbilt, Rice U, Emory, Wake Forest U, UNC Chapel Hill, Georgia Institute of Tech, UMiami and UF are all top notch school IN THE SOUTH.

          So please STOP this hate talk. No one needs it.

          Reply
          • Uhh
            March 26, 2014 at 11:12 pm (9 months ago)

            St. Louis and Kansas City (both are in MO, for the geographically challenged) are both Midwest, not southern. The whole of MO is midwest. Especially the northern part where these two cities are. You must have never traveled. Swing by KC some time and you will have the most authentic and true experience of what Midwest is. When you go west to KS it feels more Great Plains. The upper Midwest feels a bit like Canada. The Great Lakes region is very Midwestern too. And to that moron above who says Texas is part of the Midwest, if he’s actually American then he’s a retard. It’s such unreal stupidity..I don’t believe it’s possible.

        • greg
          August 5, 2014 at 10:37 pm (5 months ago)

          Pretty obvious who the idiot here is….Us’uns here in the South will be praying for you even if you hold us in disdain. We don’t have hate for you poor misguided folks that have that opinion of Southerners, we just want to say, “Bless his heart” and try to ignore your ignorance.

          Reply
      • southern
        February 25, 2014 at 3:49 pm (10 months ago)

        Bless.your little ole heart.

        Reply
      • Person
        July 7, 2014 at 1:00 pm (6 months ago)

        Hey no need to be mean there bud

        Reply
      • Sal
        July 20, 2014 at 1:34 pm (5 months ago)

        Like the Northeners are any better. Everywhere, there’s 90% of idiots and 1% of intelligent ones. The 9% are the average.

        Reply
    • Linda Leggett/Womack
      September 19, 2013 at 4:22 am (1 year ago)

      I’m lived in Texas 64 years and now reside just north of Savannah, Ga. Growing up my mother would refer to to something not being straight as “Whanky jawed.” A tantrum was a walleyed hissie fit and a gourmet meal was red beans, fried potatoes and sweet cornbread.

      Shug

      Reply
      • Gretchen
        July 30, 2014 at 10:45 am (5 months ago)

        the description of that gourmet meal sounds wonderful! I may just have me a light brunch pretty soon! Except, i’m in the midwest….no southern food until i get back home to Louisiana!

        Reply
    • PS
      September 21, 2013 at 7:18 am (1 year ago)

      Haha funny! reading this from Down Under (Australia). I am yet to visit America but i can’t wait to come across!!

      Reply
      • Gretchen
        July 30, 2014 at 10:46 am (5 months ago)

        Come on over!

        Reply
    • NG
      November 3, 2013 at 5:27 pm (1 year ago)

      My family uses that saying all the time and we’re from Pennsylvania….then again my family uses ALOT of southern saying.

      Reply
    • Julie
      November 30, 2013 at 11:09 am (1 year ago)

      Dumb as a box of rocks. We used that in California, too.

      Reply
      • MotoJ
        October 16, 2014 at 12:15 am (2 months ago)

        I’m from So.California (hey, does that make me southern? hah!). Haven’t heard of “dumb as a box of rocks,” however we do say, “dumber than a bag of hammers,” “not the sharpest tool in the shed,” “a few shades beyond blonde,” and “not playing with a full deck.”

        Reply
    • Abby
      January 18, 2014 at 7:32 am (11 months ago)

      I’m from North Carolina & I hear that a lot around here too!

      Reply
    • barb
      March 20, 2014 at 11:17 am (9 months ago)

      I’m an Okie, and i hear ‘stupid as a stump’ a lot..

      Reply
    • Timothy
      June 21, 2014 at 5:59 pm (6 months ago)

      You just have been around more Southerners alot more. That is all. Perhaps you could go to a Speech Therapist for help or go up to a Northern State for one year. I went up North and I mingled with the people of Michigan. At first they told me you have an accent from the South. I stayed with them and learned how Northern People live I did pick up the Northern Accent and those Northern Words that they use. But I am still Southern and always will be! I respect them and they trspect me.

      Reply
    • amanda
      August 12, 2014 at 9:49 am (4 months ago)

      Referring to those whose parents were yankees but they were born in the south: if a cat had kittens in the oven, we wouldnt call them biscuits!

      Reply
  2. Barry Hollander
    June 29, 2011 at 1:06 pm (3 years ago)

    June bug. I’m fairly certain the same bug is called by other names elsewhere in the U.S., but down here it’s junebug (also a song by that Athens band, the B-52s — yeah, I’m in Athens).

    Reply
    • Angela
      August 27, 2013 at 10:42 pm (1 year ago)

      even though they always seem to show up in July…

      Reply
    • Janelle
      September 2, 2013 at 7:00 pm (1 year ago)

      I don’t know about anywhere else, but they’re June bugs in the part of Ohio that I live in.

      Reply
    • Abby
      January 18, 2014 at 7:34 am (11 months ago)

      Yep. Definitely that one. (I’m from NC) Also, my two cousins, my grandma, and I were all born in June, so my grandma referred to us as the Junebugs

      Reply
      • Kelsey
        June 23, 2014 at 2:27 pm (6 months ago)

        Lol a June bug is an actual bug. They come out usually at night in July and they fly. They’re a brownish golden color. I’m scared to death of those critters!! :O

        Reply
        • Carole
          September 28, 2014 at 11:03 pm (3 months ago)

          I’ve never seen them at night, just lightning bugs. And bats.

          Reply
  3. Miller
    June 29, 2011 at 5:54 pm (3 years ago)

    Love it!

    Reply
  4. Garrett Cox
    June 29, 2011 at 8:06 pm (3 years ago)

    Well, we actually have three classifications of Yankee:

    1) Yankee: someone who comes to the South to visit and then returns back to the North.

    2) Carbetbagger: someone who comes to the South to visit and then returns back to the North, with a bag of loot.

    3) DAMN YANKEE!: someone who comes to the South and doesn’t return back to the North.

    Reply
    • cwhig
      January 5, 2013 at 11:14 am (2 years ago)

      My eighth grade teacher from East Tennessee said she was twelve years old before she learned that “damn Yankee” was two words.

      Reply
    • madi
      August 9, 2013 at 5:53 pm (1 year ago)

      I agree. I am dreading admitting this, but my idjit brother moved to NEW YORK. He is now a yankee, but here’s his classification: Idjit Traitor.

      Reply
    • KT
      August 16, 2013 at 1:29 pm (1 year ago)

      Don’t forget:
      4)DAMN F’N YANKEE!: One that doesn’t return to the North, but wants to constantly complain about the heat and our Sourthern ways while they take all of our jobs.
      Yes, snooty ass Yankees, it’s HOT down here! And YES, there are Southerners that live here! If you don’t like it, I’ll give y’all dirctions to I-10… NORTH! Otherwise you are more than welcome to stay, but Shut-Up and Blend-In because this is OUR COUNTRY!

      Reply
      • Angela
        August 27, 2013 at 10:44 pm (1 year ago)

        I don’t understand why, if they want to move south, they don’t just go to Florida… It’s basically the north with a tan there.

        Reply
        • Bontemps
          November 4, 2013 at 11:11 pm (1 year ago)

          I’m 100 percent with her on that. Lived in Tampa 3 years. It is a melting pot. Not Southern, ppl never wave back. Keep to themselves. It’ll always b Yankee state to me.

          Reply
          • G.R.I.T.S.
            March 10, 2014 at 3:02 am (10 months ago)

            I’ve lived in South Florida for 26 years…born and raised here. We were once a southern state until the “number 4 classification” of yankees have moved down here from Ohio, Michigan, what have you, and have turned poor Florida into an overpopulated watering hole of disaster…we’re nicknamed the transient state.
            Every year more and more northerners come down here and never return back home. Let it be known that us Florida and WANT YOU TO GO BACK HOME!!!!! It contributes to our non southern hospitality because we’re too busy trying to be complete jackasses to convince you to move back up north. Seriously, go home…

          • Victoria
            March 20, 2014 at 10:04 am (9 months ago)

            I live in South Florida and one of the things I regret is the lack of Southern hospitality that I found in places like St. Augustine and Savannah.
            Nonetheless, I live in the suburbs and my neighbors are truly Southern in their ways and accents, which I love. Is nice to find that among all the rush and traffic and fake tans there are nice people who ask you your name before demanding something, that say hello in elevators or when they pass you in the street, that don’t mind stopping so you can cross the street safely. It is a blessing to live in the South. As for those who are hating, on Florida or the South, know that the South is not a merely geographical location; the South is a state of mind.

      • Jbella
        September 12, 2013 at 7:16 pm (1 year ago)

        I guess I am a yankee, but where I always visited in tx I always came home noticing how much more friendly y’all were than us “yankees.” But damn, proving me wrong. I never realized how much anger you have towards us…….I just don’t get it

        Reply
      • BigStew
        March 15, 2014 at 1:10 pm (9 months ago)

        I-10 runs east and west, not north and south, I-55, I-59, I-95, runs north, I truly believe that a civil war will do this country some good, If you know yourself and you know your enemy you need not fear the outcome of 100 battles!

        Reply
    • Billee-Bob
      August 19, 2013 at 1:44 pm (1 year ago)

      Yankee is someone who doesn’t like the cold anymore…. but needs to put up with locals who are ignorant, intolerant and don’t believe in science or much of anything else… other than da baaable. The stereotype fits, yallllz

      Reply
  5. Beckie
    June 29, 2011 at 9:40 pm (3 years ago)

    We never had a lot of mosquito bites. Nor did mosquitos ever bite us a lot.

    We were always “Eat up.” Mama’d say, “You can’t out there or else you’ll get eat up.”

    Also, let’s discuss exaggerations. When it’s cold outside, it’s never 30 degrees. It’s always 17,000 degrees below zero.” Same thing with heat. It’s not hot. “It’s 89 million degrees outside.” And your grandmother never made a lot of food. She made made enough to feed the entire world and anyone else who might drop by.”

    Oh, and let’s not forget to take things to the most extreme. You are not merely irritated. You are irritated TO DEATH. Nor did something merely make you laugh. It tickled you TO DEATH.

    Reply
    • Lauren
      May 19, 2013 at 6:26 pm (2 years ago)

      That’s right. I live in Tennessee and if your from the north come on down for a good ole nice visit. It’s amazin in the south! I swear I’ll never move to the north!! The south is my place and livin on a farm is quite great and livin on 100 acres is awesome and not havin to worry about stupid city limits is also great. And by the way everybody who is home grown in the south drops there g’s
      Here’s a couple sayins used in my family:
      •Y’all •can’t as in cannot aint said can’t it’s said caint with the I in it
      •dumber than a door nail
      •rustier than a pitch fork in the barn
      •fixin to
      •those dang Mosquitas are eatin me up!
      •he’s so stupid he he can’t poor his own piss out of his boot with instructions written on the heel
      •he/she’s madder than a wet hen
      Yep so that’s a couple I’m not gonna type anymore my hand hurts

      Reply
      • sumthinother
        September 12, 2013 at 2:58 pm (1 year ago)

        drunker than a bicycle :)

        Reply
      • Miss Nancy
        January 14, 2014 at 8:23 am (11 months ago)

        You’re from the north. It is not your from the north. You’re is you are.
        I lived in the south and they don’t teach spelling or phonics. Lebanon, TN is pronounced Lebanin. Maury County is pronounced Murray County. Maryville is pronounced Marvull. Shelbyville is pronounced Shovelvull. I don’t blame the students because the teachers never learned phonics. I blame the institutions of higher learning for advancing those that cannot read and write. For the record, a Yankee is a person from Maine.

        Reply
        • Carole
          September 28, 2014 at 11:10 pm (3 months ago)

          Miss Nancy, a yankee is anyone from north of the Mason Dixon line.

          Reply
  6. JCJ
    June 30, 2011 at 11:11 pm (3 years ago)

    “Down Yonder”

    “I reckon”

    If someone does something uncalled for we say -”there ain’t no sense in that”

    And my Grandma always used to say – “I’ll swanee to my name!” She could never explain exactly what it meant, but she used it in the context of “I can’t believe it!”or “I swear”

    Reply
    • donna
      January 22, 2014 at 12:45 pm (11 months ago)

      Spitting image as in “she’s the spitting image of her grandma”, originally derived from “spirit and image”.

      Reply
  7. JCJ
    June 30, 2011 at 11:12 pm (3 years ago)

    Oh… and “tobaggon” in reference to a Winter cap, or what Northerners would call a “Beanie”

    Reply
    • Hunni
      April 23, 2013 at 5:22 pm (2 years ago)

      We call winter hat a ‘toque’(pronounced TOO-k) in Canada. I haven’t heard it called a beanie yet. My step mother is from Boston and still just calls it a winger hat.

      A toboggan is a sled used sliding down hills in winter.

      Reply
      • Hunni
        April 23, 2013 at 5:23 pm (2 years ago)

        Winter hat*

        Reply
    • Drgn
      June 24, 2013 at 3:47 am (1 year ago)

      No, a toboggan and beanie are two different things. A toboggan is a winter hat and is so long you fold the bottom of it back up. A beanie is short and for style, not protecting your ears from the cold.

      Reply
      • georgia_redneck
        August 14, 2013 at 11:05 pm (1 year ago)

        ive never heard a person say beanie or toboggin its always been a boggin or hat down here in georgia

        Reply
    • Janelle
      September 2, 2013 at 7:06 pm (1 year ago)

      Where I’m at in Ohio it’s a tobaggon.

      Reply
  8. Christy Davis
    July 1, 2011 at 4:06 pm (3 years ago)

    This is great! Also, “Darn it” (my Texas friends had never heard that one). And not sure if you’ve heard this one or “Shame the devil; tell the truth!” Ha!

    Great article

    Reply
    • Joshua
      April 2, 2013 at 12:26 am (2 years ago)

      I live in Houston and everyone uses “darn it” here.

      Reply
  9. Kathryn
    July 3, 2011 at 11:37 pm (3 years ago)

    One that we used in Tennessee way more than “ya’ll” is “yun’s” or “youngun’s”. Yun’s can be used for anything, including just one person. However younguns is reserved for the wippersnappers. (And if you’re 85, then everyone is a youngun.)
    Another thing we have are those little pearls of wisdom (or just random bullmalarky) like:
    “Speak of the devil and the horns pop out” – often shortened to speak of the devil.
    “Ear’s itchin’? Someone’s talkin’ ’bout ye!”

    (P.S. Is it just me or does talking about being Southern make you want to talk with way stronger of an accent? Like it’s not strong enough… )
    “Oh! Someone done walked over my grave” – used after a shiver or cold chill. This one is a bit rare. My family says it all the time, but I get odd looks from some people.

    Reply
    • Morgan
      March 22, 2013 at 7:33 pm (2 years ago)

      In Tampa Florida we pronounce it (young-in) but a lot of people use that

      Reply
      • Miss Nancy
        January 14, 2014 at 8:27 am (11 months ago)

        People from Tampa pronounce Lutz as Lutes or Loots. Bob Lutz use to run Chrysler and he said his last name rhymes with guts.

        Reply
  10. Karen
    July 5, 2011 at 3:33 pm (3 years ago)

    When you meet up with a friend you always ask “How’s your Mom and them?” Basically your Mom always comes first.

    And if someone is really nice you say they are “sweeter’n Tupelo honey.”

    “Honey, you need to fish or cut bait.” Usualy said to a man who won’t ask his girlfriend to marry him. :-)

    “That dog won’t hunt.” It means that your excuse or story is not good.

    Reply
    • Scarlett
      November 17, 2012 at 10:54 pm (2 years ago)

      Down here in Mobile, we don’t actually say “…Mom and them,” it usually comes out more like “Hey y’all! How’s your Momenim?”

      Reply
      • Jessica
        March 18, 2013 at 7:30 am (2 years ago)

        Yes! Here in north Alabama, we say ‘nem. Your mom ‘nem. But it’s usually the way you wrote it, one big word. :)

        Reply
      • Kim g
        April 16, 2013 at 2:24 am (2 years ago)

        Im in va beach and My friend in nola had the ” randazzos” king cake guy refuse to sell me a cake til i pronounced ‘pecan ‘ correctly lol. I remembered hearing this saying and since its a long running joke about the darn nut. I asked the guy sooooo. ‘Howyourmomanem?’ Lol. I got my cake;). See i peee can! Lol

        Reply
        • Angela
          August 27, 2013 at 10:51 pm (1 year ago)

          I am from Texas where the state tree is the pecan tree… Until I left Texas I had never heard anyone, not on the TV, pronounce it any way other than puh-con.

          Reply
  11. Bre Bliss
    July 28, 2011 at 2:22 am (3 years ago)

    Ok…so I’m from Ohio (Southeartern) what kind of Yankee I’m is?

    Reply
    • Lauren
      August 3, 2011 at 12:35 pm (3 years ago)

      Bre, Ohio is one of those interesting on-the-border states because even though y’all are technically north of the Mason Dixon line you’re not nearly as Yankee as someone from New York. I’d put your question back to you: how would you define yourself as a Yankee? Moreover, what traits are inherent to an Ohio native?

      Reply
      • Bubba's Daughter
        March 28, 2012 at 2:19 am (3 years ago)

        I’ve got family that moved from Ga. to Ohio, so the kids are northerners in some ways,but they visit the south a lot and were brought up by and around southerners, so they’re not totally like Ohians either.

        In South Carolina, at least my family’s section, they do not use fixin’/fittin’ at all;don’t know why.

        Reply
        • Lauren
          July 31, 2012 at 4:09 am (2 years ago)

          Where I live someone who lives passed the Jackson or the Tupelo area in Mississippi is a Yankee. We don’t consider a lot of states that are “technically” the south as the south. North Carolina, for example, is not southern to the deep South, because anything with the word north in it is not southern!

          Reply
          • Tori
            December 5, 2012 at 10:58 pm (2 years ago)

            I beg to differ on that one. I have lived in NC all my life and there are some pretty backwoods kinda places. I was raised in one of them places and we have our city parts but overall we are pretty southern. My friend in Louisiana can argue all day long we ain’t southern but I am, and I can say that proudly.

          • Eric
            December 13, 2012 at 1:07 am (2 years ago)

            I resent that. I am a proud citizen of the Great and Soverign State of North Carolina. My family served with distinction in the Cofederate Military as Officers and enlisted and in the Confederate Government. I am very proud of my Southern heritage. I forgive you anyway.

          • Leah
            September 24, 2013 at 1:08 pm (1 year ago)

            I don’t know a lot about NC or SC except that SC’s gunlaws are not what we are use to seeing here in the Southern states. I know they don’t accept concealed carry permits from Alabama but NC does. I always figured that would be reversed.

      • Ginger
        May 29, 2013 at 3:02 pm (2 years ago)

        Ohio most certainly is Yankee. It shares a lake with Canada, for crying out loud. I’m from WV. We barely make the cut, and we’re south of the Mason Dixon. There is very little true Southern culture left. Honey Boo Boo is supposedly Southern, but she’s just some 6yo in Georgia that talks just like any DMV clerk in Brooklyn.

        Reply
      • Ginger
        May 29, 2013 at 3:04 pm (2 years ago)

        Ohio most certainly is Yankee. It shares a lake with Canada, for crying out loud. I’m from WV. We barely make the cut, and we’re south of the Mason Dixon. There is very little true Southern culture left. Honey Boo Boo is supposedly Southern, but she’s just some 6yo in Georgia that talks just like a Brooklyn DMV clerk.

        Reply
      • Ginger
        May 29, 2013 at 3:05 pm (2 years ago)

        Ohio most certainly is Yankee. It shares a lake with Canada, for crying out loud. I’m from WV. We barely make the cut, and we’re south of the Mason Dixon.

        Reply
    • Jasey stout
      January 15, 2013 at 8:45 pm (2 years ago)

      thats not southern at all so sorry

      Reply
      • KC
        March 27, 2013 at 11:39 pm (2 years ago)

        Man you guys have some bad grammar.

        Reply
        • mckenzie
          April 13, 2013 at 6:36 pm (2 years ago)

          southern people don’t have bad grammar we all have accents they are different! Yankees irritate me so much with all y’all thinkin you have good knowledge and were fools.

          Reply
          • Vicki Wade
            June 6, 2013 at 8:57 am (2 years ago)

            You tell it like it is MCKENZIE. I love the Southern accent and it discusses me when a Southerner starts talking like a northerner so they don’t a fend them. Northern teachers don’t even like you saying to them yes-um instead of yes mam. They will give you a detention for it. Makes me want to say it even more.

          • jamie
            June 27, 2013 at 4:21 pm (1 year ago)

            I am from the deep south. I stay literally about an hour from the gulf. We usually don’t consider many states that are below the dixie line to be south. If you do not eat crawfish or do not live in a place where the humidity is always over 50 percent throughout the summer and there is never snow….its pretty miserable. The air is full of salt from the gulf and yet, we do not even notice it anymore… There really ain’t no place like it.

          • Miss Nancy
            January 14, 2014 at 8:29 am (11 months ago)

            What about people saying winda or winder, instead of window?

        • virginia sweetheart
          April 13, 2013 at 7:14 pm (2 years ago)

          all y’all yanks need to take yer bad attitudes and get! Yankees always irritate me so much thinkin yall are the only ones who know knowledge!

          Reply
          • madi
            August 9, 2013 at 6:03 pm (1 year ago)

            Yeah. I’m from Sahth Cackalacky, and all them yanks are comin here and takin all the good outta the sahth. I nurly shot my damn neighbor…he’s a yank and he stole my gun! when i gawt it back, i poinid it at ‘im, and he was a yella belly and called the cops!

        • Marci
          April 18, 2013 at 8:57 am (2 years ago)

          You speak about our grammar, yet you didn’t use any punctuation in your sentence. There are Southerners, just like there are Northerners, who use poor grammar; however, if you’ve been brought up like I was and those I know, we use proper grammar, much more so than even the British. With that said, no where above Virginia is considered part of the South. Northern Florida is Southern. We have taken to thinking of Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas as Southern states. The idea that North Carolina isn’t Southern is silly. My family was Georgian prior to the Revolutionary War.

          Reply
          • Okie Farmer
            June 9, 2013 at 10:37 am (2 years ago)

            MARCI ! You need to go back to school, and take a history lesson. The CSA ( Confederate States of America ) the Confederacy’ was a government set in 2/8/1861. states; South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Texas, Georgia, Louisiana. These states formed the “Confederacy and the Confederate constitution”. Other states joined after that point. So in your own words saying Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas are “Not Southern States” is “silly”

            The Oklahoma Indian Territory, because it was not a state at that time (confederacy territory) had many battles pushing back the Kansas ‘union regular soldiers” and stopping their push, south and east to trap the other southern states. A note of Oklahoma pride; General Stand Watie (Indian)officially became the last Confederate general to surrender on June 25, 1865.

            My Family hails from Texas and also settled Oklahoma when it was a territory We are Texas, Oklahoma and Southern Proud. We will Defend our southern way of life till death if need be. God Bless Oklahoma, Texas and our Southern heritage.

            You can take you’re (we have taken thinking) and shove it you know where,

            “Don’t Tread on Me” PS. have a nice day!

          • Shamu
            July 31, 2013 at 9:52 am (1 year ago)

            How many British people do you know?

      • mckenzie
        April 13, 2013 at 6:40 pm (2 years ago)

        is Virginia southern? cuz I wouldn’t consider myself a yankee! but I don’t know about y’all, but when its sunny and its rainin we’ll say “the devil is hittin his wife with a fryin pan” now round here we say that all the time, but goin other places and all I get some bad looks.

        Reply
        • Johnathan H.
          July 12, 2013 at 6:11 am (1 year ago)

          Hell naw :(

          Reply
        • Angela
          August 27, 2013 at 10:56 pm (1 year ago)

          Have you ever heard of a man named Robert E. Lee?

          Reply
        • Bontemps
          November 4, 2013 at 11:28 pm (1 year ago)

          I’ve heard that down here in South Louisiana too. That’s what my Maw Maw always told me. I guess that’s a Southern thing. We say Maw Maw and paw paw and address our godparents as Paran andNanny or Nan. Mama is another to point out. I don’t hear that up north. I had 5 living grandparents but not one grandma or grandpa.

          Reply
          • Tay-Tay
            May 21, 2014 at 8:35 pm (7 months ago)

            I think that is only south LA with Maw Maw .
            I live in Shreveport and i have never heard.

      • southern-sweetheart
        April 13, 2013 at 7:17 pm (2 years ago)

        is Virginia southern cuz my momma is very southern and ive been raised in a southern household and with southern hospitality but many say that Virginia isn’t and I will beg to differ! id say im just as southern as anyother southerner.

        Reply
    • Angela
      August 27, 2013 at 10:58 pm (1 year ago)

      Yeah… Ohio is definitely Yankee… it’s north of Kentucky… they’re Yankees too, just don’t say that to their faces.

      Reply
    • Rebecca
      April 15, 2014 at 9:36 pm (8 months ago)

      Something interesting. Most of Indiana is full of farms and people are considered conservative and “Hillbilly” unless you live in the northwest or lake and porter county. We are essentially Chicagoans. Nearly everyone has a relative that lived in Chicago at some point or your family still works there. If not you moved here to work at the steel mills and again everyone has some family member that worked in the steel mills. We don’t really fit-in with the rest of Indiana. We are generally on the poor side while the rest of Indiana has some dough.

      Reply
  12. Lynne
    August 2, 2011 at 9:15 pm (3 years ago)

    Growing up, my momma used to tell me we lived in the “boondocks”…When you live in the “boondocks” you have to drive “a ways” to a restaurant or go shopping…(closest restaurant was Miz Hickman’s on Highway 87 South or Hackney’s Seafood House in Jonesboro)
    “Lollygaggin” this is when you take your “sweet time” to do something and your momma tells you to “Quit lollygaggin around!”
    You can also use “lollygaggin” to explain that you spent your time just “putzin around” in other words “not doing much of anything AND ENJOYING EVERY MINUTE OF IT.”

    Reply
    • Markus
      October 4, 2011 at 9:32 pm (3 years ago)

      Mosey. As in “Let’s mosey on over to the store.” I have never in my life heard a yankee say mosey, in any context.

      Reply
      • Emily
        July 4, 2012 at 2:04 am (2 years ago)

        I use the word “mosey” all the time. I’m from Pa though. I may be considered as a “yankee” but, my familys roots are in the south, an I was raised that way. I wouldn’t choose to be any other way.

        Reply
      • Kb
        January 26, 2013 at 1:04 pm (2 years ago)

        I’m from Wisconsin. Absolutely no family history in the South. Everybody here says “mosey”

        Reply
    • Ginger
      May 29, 2013 at 3:06 pm (2 years ago)

      We called it the boonies, for short, aka the sticks and the holler.

      Reply
  13. Best of both worlds
    January 13, 2012 at 3:09 pm (3 years ago)

    Why do you answer your own questions,(as a yankee would say)! Example: I’m gettin ready to go to the store yea!, I was listnin to that song yea!, That just aint right no!
    Grew up in NH, moved to southern LA. at age 14 and lived wiht my daddy for 3 1/2 years. Yes I did move back north, but I still talk like a coonass. I would say I have the best of both worlds and consider myself a coonyank!

    Reply
    • Bontemps
      November 4, 2013 at 11:35 pm (1 year ago)

      That’s a cajun French thing bc our parents grew up with bilingual parents if not bilingual themselves and I think that’s purely a South Louisiana (anything South of Baton Rouge) thing. The further down you go the more you hear it.

      Reply
  14. Melanie
    May 31, 2012 at 11:20 am (3 years ago)

    There is just something delightful about the word cattywampus that I just start smiling when I hear it. But my grandmother used to tell my sister and I that she was going “to warp our frames” if we didn’t stop acting up. We understood the context quite well but it wasn’t until many years later that we understood the literal meaning. Powerful stuff. My slightly uppity mother (of the Southern variety, mind you) tried her best to wash the Southern accent out of us because it just didn’t suit. My dad was a TV weatherman who could turn his accent off and on like a light switch but dad is COOOOOOOUUUUNTRY! Needless to say, we’ve taken our NC Appalachia accent up a notch just for spite. That accent is the winner of hearts, I tell y’all, especially out here in AZ where people think I’m just the most charming thing ever. Another good Southernism is “15-blue-million” as in “I’ve got 15-blue-million things to do today so don’t you be 15-blue-million-and-one!”

    Reply
  15. Lauren
    July 15, 2012 at 3:53 pm (2 years ago)

    im from Jersey and I love southern accents and ppl who speak them. It’s endearing to hear another accent but i have to say that the predjudice i receive from southerners is horrible. they should be embarrassed the way some treat “Yankees”. Having any accent doesnt make you better or worse than anyone. It just means we’re different. We’re all Americans and whatever English we speak should be respected.

    Reply
    • Sheila
      August 5, 2012 at 10:41 pm (2 years ago)

      I too am from NJ. I have lived in the South for almost 10 years. I still feel the resentment. Even at church, there is prejuidice. I am always being told you don’ t understand. When I first tried to vote I was given a hard time. Why do I stay, because you all want me to leave and you are not going to win.

      Reply
      • rick
        December 11, 2012 at 6:33 pm (2 years ago)

        then leave ya god dam yank

        Reply
      • Angela
        May 23, 2013 at 5:29 pm (2 years ago)

        I hate it that people are being ugly toward you just ’cause you come from somewhere else. True Southerners that are raised right will go out of their way to make you feel welcome and “at home.” The reason we get defensive or resentful is because many Yankees move here and then start making fun of the way we do things. They want to change us. Maybe you can explain why they move away from the North and then try to turn us into what they left. We love our history and most of us will defend it to the death, but I hope you make some lifelong friends here!

        Reply
      • Ginger
        May 29, 2013 at 3:09 pm (2 years ago)

        “You don’t understand” is a polite way of telling you to butt out. It sounds like you’re some kind of know-it-all that came down to “slum it” for the weather and low cost of living… a carpetbagger, in other words. Be nice, and they’ll be nice to you, but don’t come down to the South expecting them to change their ways.

        Reply
        • Bud
          July 23, 2013 at 8:34 pm (1 year ago)

          In other words, “we don’t care how you did it up nawth”

          Reply
    • madi
      August 9, 2013 at 6:12 pm (1 year ago)

      Finally, a yank is startin to make sense. Hey, you want some southern hospitality? Yall come down here, to South Cackalacky. In yankspeak, that would be “Carolina”, but no respectable southerner says carolina. None.
      By the way, i kinda like joysey accents. My favorite show’s protagonist’s voice actor is from NJ.
      Though you’re still a yank, you seem respectable…sorta.

      Reply
  16. Barbara
    July 15, 2012 at 4:16 pm (2 years ago)

    “HELP YOUR PLATE.” (Help it do WHAT, exactly?)

    “I’LL CARRY YOU TO THE STORE.” (Are you sure you can lift me? Maybe you should just give me a ride there in your car.)

    “YOU CAN PUT ME OUT AT THE CHURCH.” (Why would I do that? SoundS kind of rude. I’ll let you out of the car at church, though.)

    Reply
  17. Hamilton
    July 15, 2012 at 8:31 pm (2 years ago)

    My grandmother used to say “I declare!”

    Also she would look up and say its goin to be a beautiful day, ther rid enough blue to make a Dutchman’s pants.

    Reply
  18. Melissa M
    July 20, 2012 at 12:08 am (2 years ago)

    My grandmother is from Lakeland, Florida and she uses words like “supper” to mean dinner and “fillin station” instead of a gas station. Also a “buggy” is a shopping cart. And “dilly dally” is the same as “lollygaggin”

    Reply
    • Lauren
      July 31, 2012 at 4:15 am (2 years ago)

      Florida isn’t considered the South by the rest of the southern states. Actually, most geographers claim that it isn’t apart of the South. It may just be where your mamaw grew up.

      Reply
      • Florida Cracker
        August 2, 2012 at 10:16 pm (2 years ago)

        There are PLENTY of DEEP south Floridans! My family, both sides, have been in Florida for well over 100 years! True, we get more “snowbirds” (there’s a word for you, means yankee who comes to Florida to ride out winter, then goes back north, or eventually retires and stays here)than other southern states, but leave the cities, and you’ll be smack dab in the DEEP south!

        Reply
        • Charles
          January 19, 2013 at 1:42 am (2 years ago)

          Very true. I was born and raised in Miami, and if you strayed into Homestead, there were plenty of Southern accents to be heard. My relatives in Ocala would definitely beg to differ. Besides which, I do seem to recall that Florida was part of the Confederacy…

          Reply
          • Shanon
            March 2, 2013 at 7:59 pm (2 years ago)

            I agree FL is the south. I am a third generation native floridian on both sides and while I live in tampa and we do have a lot of yankees and snow birds, if you go out into any rural area and you will hear a lot of southern colloquialisms that I use too. I never noticed it until friends in grade school made fun of me for saying ‘em. When I went up to Tallahassee for school I was finally comforted that most of the native Floridians from up there have southern accents and use southern words. My sister lives in AL and it took her no time flat for her southern accent to come out in her.

  19. Lea
    September 16, 2012 at 2:04 am (2 years ago)

    I love how my Texan mama says, “Window and Potato.”
    She says, “Winduh and potatuh.” Then, there is a word like “tight.” It’s pronounced as thought the “I” were long. Tat?

    Reply
    • Chele
      September 26, 2012 at 10:45 am (2 years ago)

      Lea, I’m from Texas & I tend to talk like that! LOL! The faster I talk, the harder my accent & I drop my g’s

      Reply
    • Kelsey
      June 23, 2014 at 2:31 pm (6 months ago)

      Some people say taters for potatoes lol. I have family from Arkansas and I live in Texas so I get some sayings from both places lol.
      And when my mom gets mad all her i’s r long spunding like “whaa” for why and “ahh” for I and “mahh” for my lol

      Reply
  20. Hi
    October 15, 2012 at 7:52 pm (2 years ago)

    I am from north atlanta in the suburbs. I live in the alpharetta area. Would I be considered a southerner? My speech isnt southern and we dont really say or do southerner things.i get a little annoyed when people say southerners are in georgia more like south georgia because up north is more like a high middle class/middle class/upperclass.

    Reply
    • Amanda Acree
      October 23, 2012 at 3:15 pm (2 years ago)

      I am sorry for your confusion but “southern” is not a class. It is a region. I am from a middle-class home as well, but I know good and well that I come from a southern home. The southern region is known for several reasons, we have our food, our vernacular, and our traditions. You may or may not consider yourself a “southerner” that is completely up to you and your lifestyle. However, living in the southern U.S. does typically put you in the “southern region.” I hope you find out where you are from and what you consider your traditions, until then, know that the south is always willing to accept you as you are. Bless your heart.

      Reply
      • Steve
        December 18, 2012 at 3:58 pm (2 years ago)

        Hi, don’t feel bad, at least she didn’t say “Bless your little heart,” or, worse still, “Bless your pea-pickin’ little heart.”

        Reply
      • madi
        August 9, 2013 at 6:17 pm (1 year ago)

        You’re wrong still. The south may be a region, but it’s traditions, and the soul, not where you live. Though i do hate damn yanks.

        Reply
        • Gene Mueller
          April 10, 2014 at 10:33 am (8 months ago)

          Hey y’all, when you refer to the South, remember to capitalize it. It’s the South, not lower-case south. The South is a proper name of a region, dagnabbit!

          Reply
    • Hope @ Fairhope Supply Co.
      December 17, 2012 at 10:21 pm (2 years ago)

      It all depends “Who your people are.”

      You can live in Georgia, but if your parents are Yankees, then you are being raised in a Yankee home. Lots of people in Metro-Atlanta are Yankees. Bless their lil’ ol’ hearts!

      Reply
    • KC
      March 27, 2013 at 11:49 pm (2 years ago)

      I’m from south Georgia, and I don’t have a southern accent or southern grammar. The social class of a person does not determine, if a person will have southern grammar or not. My mom is a teacher,so I am not allowed to use slang.It has more to do with education than anything else.

      Reply
      • Angela
        May 23, 2013 at 5:42 pm (2 years ago)

        Well I never! Education, my fanny. I grew up in an educated, musical family. We were poor as dirt but were introduced to the arts and because of our music (including much opera) we didn’t have Southern accents. As I grew into an adult, my accent became more and more Southern…not hillbilly or redneck…just Southern. It’s very akin to what you’d hear in England, only with a few different inflections. Really quite beautiful without the nasal twang of some regions. I know lots of highly educated, professional people with heavy accents. It wraps around you like velvet. Mmm-mmm.

        Reply
  21. Meade
    October 24, 2012 at 4:14 pm (2 years ago)

    I hear lots of Southerners saying “You Guys” now. I thought it was only here in Virginia because we are closer to “the line”, but I was in TN,GA, NC, and SC- almost everyone said “you guys”. Now people in Virginia say both y’all and you guys, like most of the South, people are not saying “Y’all” as much. Its changing.

    Reply
    • Steve
      December 18, 2012 at 4:02 pm (2 years ago)

      In Texas, and in Oklahoma, it’s still “y’all” although in Oklahoma it is often closer to the full “you all.” But “you guys” rarely to never. Only Yankees say that. :)

      Reply
      • mckenzie
        April 13, 2013 at 6:49 pm (2 years ago)

        im from southern Virginia and everyone round here still says yall I don’t know anyone but yanks that say “you guys” or “you all”

        Reply
        • Hunni
          April 23, 2013 at 5:57 pm (2 years ago)

          I’m Canadian and find myself saying “y’all” sometimes. I actually find it comfortable speaking with several of the southern words despite the looks I get.

          Reply
      • Okie Farmer
        June 10, 2013 at 3:31 am (2 years ago)

        Steve, I never heard anyone from here saying “you all.” after saying it a few times just now, it don’t even sound right.

        Reply
    • Jared
      October 9, 2014 at 12:39 am (2 months ago)

      I’m from Georgia, and it wasn’t until I moved up to north Georgia for university that I ever heard anyone say “you guys.” I was born and raised saying “y’all,” and to me “you guys” just sounds harsh on the ears.

      Reply
  22. Nashville tn
    November 8, 2012 at 5:49 pm (2 years ago)

    I can’t believe some of this haha! Southern
    People don’t all have accents or say stereotypical
    Crap. I will say we talk slow and try to speed
    It up by dropping some letters. However
    I’m from Dixon county tn I have lived in ms la
    Alabama and the only thing I have a problem with
    Is the letter I it’s not iee but aaa but other than
    That I’m told on the regular by out of towners
    Who come trying to fake an accent that I don’t
    Even sound southern however my parents and
    Other relatives ( especially from ms) have thick
    Southern accents!

    Reply
    • CORY
      April 19, 2013 at 12:59 am (2 years ago)

      i lived up in kenosha wisconsin all my life and 1 of us yankees got more commo sense then 10 southerns i noticed since w moved to mississippi first things first southerns are stupid no conception and no common sense there isnt nothing but drama down here not refreering too *ladies* but its like these little southern boys parents down here raised them to be passive aggreesive because when they talked shit and i finally got fed up with it they get knocked out to easy lmao

      Reply
      • Jim
        April 26, 2013 at 2:36 pm (2 years ago)

        Cory, either you are the most stupid person I have ever heard of or you are puttin’ us on.

        Reply
        • Emily
          May 16, 2013 at 11:24 am (2 years ago)

          Cory, you sure are making a lot of grammatical errors to have more common sense than us Southerners. You make no sense.

          Reply
      • madi
        August 9, 2013 at 6:24 pm (1 year ago)

        Um, sir? Yeah, i’m the most southern girl yalls ever gonna meet, and i’m twelve and reading on a post collegeate level. You are the idiot, ya damn yankee. Go fuck your yankee-ass self.

        Reply
  23. Jersey Girl
    November 9, 2012 at 10:13 pm (2 years ago)

    I hate you all and I can’t wait to get the hell out of here.

    Reply
    • Louisiana Belle
      November 29, 2012 at 11:36 pm (2 years ago)

      Well in that case, bless the hell out of your heart, honey.

      Reply
      • Sweet Georgia Peach
        February 12, 2013 at 2:15 am (2 years ago)

        I 2nd that, Lousiana Belle! Don’t let the doorknob hit you where the good Lord split you. ☺

        Reply
        • southern-sweetheart
          April 13, 2013 at 6:54 pm (2 years ago)

          all y’all yanks need to take yer bad attitudes and get! being southern is a way of life and if your a yankee I reckon you better get a move on it and leave!

          Reply
    • Linder
      April 3, 2013 at 3:59 pm (2 years ago)

      I wish everyone down here from NJ got the heck out.

      Reply
    • Jim
      April 26, 2013 at 2:37 pm (2 years ago)

      take I-95 north honey.

      Reply
    • madi
      August 9, 2013 at 6:27 pm (1 year ago)

      Don’t let my shotgun bullets hurt your shiny-assed yankee electic car.

      Reply
    • jaimie
      November 27, 2013 at 5:19 am (1 year ago)

      Well go on and get, take you ass somewheres else. No one told you to come down here so stop whining about it put ur big girl draws on and see yourself out. U don’t like us we don’t like you could careless really poor thing :( I think we got her all beside herself. Bless ur heart sweet heart have a swift and speedy trip back up to yank land

      Reply
    • Pepper
      October 14, 2014 at 8:02 pm (2 months ago)

      A bitch is a bitch no matter where it was born, raised, or lives.

      Reply
  24. Dwk
    November 19, 2012 at 11:30 pm (2 years ago)

    I live in the South now, and sorry to say, I don’t understand most Southern women at all. In fact, after several brushes with these strange creatures, I go out of my way to avoid them! Part of the problem is that they seem to waste most of their energy on being very judgmental, insincere (extremely fake manners and false charm), suspicious, nosy, competitive (especially with other women), manipulative, and downright nasty. On the flip side of the coin, those that have been coddled by their Daddies as girls, seem to become hopelessly spoiled “princesses” who play that angle up ad nauseum. In addition, Southern women have very narrow interests, and usually can’t hold an extended conversation regarding current and world events, literature, or culture, and have no real opinion about much in that regard. Bless your heart….. but scratch that sugar-coated Southern exterior, and you’ll find something quite unappealing and unattractive.

    Reply
    • Dwk
      November 19, 2012 at 11:41 pm (2 years ago)

      Oh, and by the way, southerners, not everybody who doesn’t have a Southern accent is a Yankee. I was born in Oregon. Bless your heart.

      Reply
      • Louisiana Belle
        November 29, 2012 at 11:40 pm (2 years ago)

        I am a Southern belle and I don’t have narrow interests at all. I make jewelry, I read about a book a day, and I cook all kinds of food. Apparently you haven’t lived here long enough to learn to love the charm of the Southern way of life.

        Reply
        • Louisiana Belle
          November 29, 2012 at 11:41 pm (2 years ago)

          Oh and by the way, you are a Yankee. Bless YOUR heart.

          Reply
      • kate
        April 2, 2013 at 5:37 pm (2 years ago)

        to southerners, oregon is part of the north, you’re a yankee. Oh, and by the way, DWK, you’re showing your limited intelligence and petty nature by making grand generalizations about an entire group of people that it’s pretty obvious you don’t understand. Knowledge does not necessarily equal intelligence or wisdom. Bless your heart.

        Reply
      • Belle
        April 20, 2013 at 4:58 pm (2 years ago)

        its bluntly obvious that you have never actually encountered a Southern Belle . Maybe only the retched southern Females are attracted to that hideous personality you just clearly advertised . So just so your informed , the GOOD southern woman , those ones we consider “Southern Belles” are beautiful , smart , and built like ah brick house hunny , we are those Miss America looking , Model walking , Big talking females who can handle the money ,the house , raise the kids and don’t mind kicking off their heels to change their own tire . I am a Mississippi women , and i’m far from the excuse of a Women you’ve previously described .. maybe that all men like you can get but sweetie that isn’t all we have to offer ( ; Bless your sweet little heart hunny ,

        Reply
        • jaimie
          November 27, 2013 at 5:25 am (1 year ago)

          You tell it belle! You go girl

          Reply
      • Jim
        April 26, 2013 at 2:38 pm (2 years ago)

        that makes you a Yankee girl.

        Reply
      • Ginger
        May 29, 2013 at 3:12 pm (2 years ago)

        Coastal Yankees are the worst of the varmint.

        Reply
    • marie
      November 27, 2012 at 1:30 pm (2 years ago)

      not every southern girl is like that ;) some are but since i’ve moved to PA last year..i’ve met plenty of girls like that HERE. maybe it’s just they’re everywhere you go…or because you’re very unfamiliar with the territory. but don’t avoid everyone because of the bad ones.

      Reply
    • John Hoke
      December 11, 2012 at 6:28 pm (2 years ago)

      g.r.i.t.s. are the best your defiantly a god dam yank

      Reply
    • rick
      December 11, 2012 at 6:35 pm (2 years ago)

      G.R.I.T.S. are the bomb diggidy

      Reply
    • Sbw
      January 13, 2013 at 12:55 am (2 years ago)

      I beg to differ. I am a Southern woman
      born and bred with a Master’s and Bachelor’s
      degree in Biology, minors in Chemistry
      and Physics, but
      That wasn’t enough, so I went ahead to Medical
      School and got my Medical degree. I read 6 news
      Web sites a day. Love art and paint and do crafts.
      I am involved in the music ministry at
      Our church. I can discuss lots of topics
      ESP. Current affairs. I have far better things to discuss
      With people than others.
      I know several ladies just like me.
      You apparently hang out with the wrong people. My
      Suggestion: Find a good church full of love and
      Laughter and you will find those women.

      Reply
    • Charlene
      July 31, 2013 at 11:27 pm (1 year ago)

      Speak for yourself DWK. Sounds to me like referring to Southern women as a group having narrow interests and being conversationally-impaired, you are the one with a narrow point of view. You are painting the canvas with a very broad brush.

      Reply
    • madi
      August 9, 2013 at 6:38 pm (1 year ago)

      If you weren’t comin down here like the damn idjit you are, you wouldn’t have to listen to our accents. And if you scratch that sugar coated southern exterior, you’ll find one of the toughest, strongest, best fighters in the history of america. Southern girls may be covered in sugar, but they will whup yo damned yankee ass before you can say Hahvid Yahd. Idjit.
      I’m a southern girl, and i have been stopped many a time on the streets beacause of my southern beauty, charm, and accent.
      I’m just glad i’m not like you. Who the hell can understand your damned accents, either?

      Reply
  25. John Hoke
    December 11, 2012 at 6:26 pm (2 years ago)

    if your talkin about route 66 you pronounce it rowt not root. roots for god dam Yankees!

    Reply
    • Ginger
      May 29, 2013 at 3:13 pm (2 years ago)

      LOL true!

      Reply
  26. amcatlos
    December 16, 2012 at 4:49 pm (2 years ago)

    Here in NC we say drop cord, not extension cord. We also say carry my car to the shop, not take my car to the shop. We also like soda, not pop. Barbecue is a noun (pork or chicken) not a verb. Just a few, but there are many more.

    Reply
    • Steve
      December 18, 2012 at 4:09 pm (2 years ago)

      Well, unless you are in Oklahoma or Texas (west says pop more than soda), but we mostly just say Coke…but here, we often mean Dr. Pepper, the nectar of the gods. Alas, Yankees didn’t get that drink until relatively recently, bless their soda-pop sippin’ little hearts.

      Reply
      • Hunni
        April 23, 2013 at 6:41 pm (2 years ago)

        I’ve been drinking Dr.Pepper since the 80s. It’s my first choice. Canadians use both ‘pop’ and ‘soda’. Pop comes in bottles and cans while soda comes from a fountain.

        Reply
        • Christy
          June 2, 2013 at 6:31 pm (2 years ago)

          You mean co-cola shug?

          Reply
  27. Maddie
    December 22, 2012 at 11:28 pm (2 years ago)

    I live in new Orleans and I totally agree with the coke thing. I also say cold drink. Also, people from new Orleans really hate it when people say nawlins. We never say that. Also, we say neutral ground, the grass in between streets.

    Reply
  28. Tim junior
    January 5, 2013 at 5:56 am (2 years ago)

    It amazes me how a lot of southerners do really judge and stereotype people just because they are not from the south (Yankees). I myself grew up in northern ms, born in mobile, and was the same exact way because I didn’t know any better. Alot of southerners have never even left the south and I think that has a lot to do with it. I myself have lived all over the US from Alaska all the way to nyc. And through my observations, it’s not to different just slight cultural changes. But not in a million years would I trade anything for my mamas fried chicken and cornbread. ;)

    Reply
  29. texas gent
    January 6, 2013 at 12:38 am (2 years ago)

    We would always ask my Papaw what he was doin and his reply would always be “just mildewin”.

    Reply
    • Ginger
      May 29, 2013 at 3:15 pm (2 years ago)

      I hate that yanks now say memaw and papaw. It’s worse than politicians dropping their g’s.

      Reply
  30. The Whistler
    January 16, 2013 at 2:33 am (2 years ago)

    Well, crud, there sure is a lot of animosity about this. I thought this post was supposed to be whimsical. I hadn’t noticed all the prejudice against northerners, but this is probably because I grew up outside of Shreveport and Bossier, and the regular cycle of people coming in due to the air force base probably got everyone used to a variety. Or it’s because I always was out to lunch. I live in California now, and I notice just as many people who put on a false front of niceness and honestly think they are nice just because they follow social rituals and ask each other the same tired questions over and over… The phrase “thank you” is used for EVERYTHING… anyway, I never could get the hang of dealing with Southern women either (even though I guess I am one) but yeah, it just seems to me that it’s more just the Southern flavor of the same disease you get everywhere… that the majority seems to run in one pack or another, with each of its members following the same routines, and those who don’t being excluded. Find me a place in this world where they don’t push you out for not matching the photo and I’ll gladly move there.

    Reply
    • Hunni
      April 23, 2013 at 6:45 pm (2 years ago)

      Try central Canada. I cant promise we would be perfect, but most of us are far less judgmental.

      Reply
      • Christy
        June 2, 2013 at 7:00 pm (2 years ago)

        Here in NC we don’t give a hoot. you smile and nod and most will do the same. Lessen they need a lesson or 2 ’bout common courtesy. Which is universal. I lived in both and honestly was told up north at least once a day to “say this or that” and then laughed at. I humored ‘em and wasn’t a shallow ass ’bout it but I was made to feel ignorant on purpose. Daily. The females there were not as friendly and jealous and not as thoughtless. Bad table manners and rarely thanked you, said excuse me,or said bless you.I was regarded as uncool when I said those things I’d heard and said my whole life. When I came to home sweet home I’s caught in the middle. Only bein 16 I’d picked up some of a northern accent and the only people that ever said anything were my closest buddies. They would playfully ignore me when I said “you guys” and insist that they were LADIES not gents and insisted that I address them as such. It didn’t take long to pick back up on my twang. And I don’t give a care whether ya like it or not.

        Reply
    • joyciedoodle
      May 24, 2013 at 3:59 pm (2 years ago)

      LOVE the Southern expression, “I’ll “carry you” there!!!

      Reply
    • Tay-Tay
      May 21, 2014 at 8:54 pm (7 months ago)

      That is true but you have to seem happy even if you are not. It just a part of life.

      Reply
  31. AZl17
    January 21, 2013 at 1:41 am (2 years ago)

    Being raised next door to folks from Baton Rouge, we picked up words and phrases as kids that we’ve come to still use now that we’re old. ‘Gimme me a washrag’ (a wash cloth) and ‘gimme a tal’ (give me a towel). We drop the ‘g’ on all words. If we’re offered something to eat or drink we say, ‘I don’t care’ (but we’ll take it because they’re servin it anyway).
    Southerners are a whole lotta fun!

    Reply
  32. Natalie
    February 1, 2013 at 1:18 am (2 years ago)

    I’m from maryland and I say most of those things. Maybe it’s cus my mom grew up in Texas and my dad in Kentucky but I would say most of the people I know in maryland talk like that but we don’t consider ourselves southern. Is it because we are below the mason Dixon? Or because we are close to more widely considered southern states? My cousins from Nebraska always tell me I have a southern accent but I never thought I did.

    Reply
    • kate
      April 2, 2013 at 5:41 pm (2 years ago)

      MD has always been sorta southernish or southern “lite”. I always thought of it as the northern most southern state and the southern most northern state lol.

      Reply
  33. Tom Burdine
    February 8, 2013 at 12:25 pm (2 years ago)

    In the South, in the mid 20th century, in Atlanta, we called them “cocolas.”

    Reply
  34. Mike
    February 10, 2013 at 8:17 pm (2 years ago)

    I grew up in SOUTHERN Illinois and so many of these sayin’s and words roll right off our tongues up here……We don’t use y’all much (unless we ‘re teasing someone), but the southern half of Illinois would be mistook for Georgia accents, iffen ya wern’t payin’ REEL close attention! There be howdy, reckon, yonder, lunch and supper, couch, glove box, poke sack, fridgerater or icebox, yard (not lawn), yarn (not a story), purty, cuter’n a button, dumber’n a box o’ rocks, purtier’n a pitcher, WALL ta WALL carpet, OLEO (never margarine!) “a ways” is a distance or could be talkin’ bout time, we’uns and you’uns, young’uns, parts is talkin’ bout a place (them parts)…… Why, we would feel purty much at home down yer way!

    Reply
    • mike
      February 11, 2013 at 11:33 am (2 years ago)

      Is there a word for yes or yeah other than “yessum?”

      Reply
      • Lauren
        May 20, 2013 at 12:28 am (2 years ago)

        yes ma’am/sir?

        Reply
  35. yolo swaggin
    February 13, 2013 at 10:41 pm (2 years ago)

    I am from Georiga. I haven’t heard most of the terms listed above. I also can’t stand the word “y’all” and I say you guys. I am still from Georiga though. So would I be considered a Yankee. Also I must say, do sountherners not believe in the letter g?

    Reply
    • kate
      April 2, 2013 at 5:42 pm (2 years ago)

      yankee parents?

      Reply
    • Jim
      April 26, 2013 at 2:41 pm (2 years ago)

      the letter g is not necessary in the words you are referring to. If you were a true southerner you would know that.

      Reply
      • Tyffani
        June 30, 2013 at 12:32 am (1 year ago)

        *Agrees with Jim*

        Reply
  36. Mack
    February 19, 2013 at 9:02 pm (2 years ago)

    Well…I grew up on a farm in Oklahoma and have a doctoral level degree but have not been able to break myself from saying “dudn’t.” It’s sort of a conflation of doesn’t and didn’t.

    Reply
  37. Sarah
    February 22, 2013 at 4:31 am (2 years ago)

    I’m from FL just moved to GA… But I have to say this… Florida is the south! How much southerner can you get? FL is one of them stars on the bars! Anyways what about twiced… More than once…I done told you to get washed up for supper twiced, now get to it before I make you go pick a switch… Switch.. A tree branch you have to go pick yourself to get your a$$ tore up with… Hitch in their Getty up… Ain’t really moving to fast.. Kinda like the Yankees that drive in Florida… Really they must drive for months gettin back home! What about your a liar the truth ain’t in ya and Jesus doesn’t love you… That’s what my dad says when he is pissed off.. Say… answer me.. Hold your breath… Its not happenin.. And just so all yall Yankees know we in the South don’t care how yall do it up North!

    Reply
    • kate
      April 2, 2013 at 5:45 pm (2 years ago)

      I have some fam. in northern Florida around Jacksonville. Fl seems like an odd mash of southern, New York Jew, and Cuba lol.

      Reply
    • CSAGrandma
      November 8, 2013 at 10:14 pm (1 year ago)

      Nice Writing. Florida was the Bread basket of the Confederacy., meaning the farms in North Florida especially, grew much needed food and other Valuables to keep us going, during the War. The only state whose Capital was NOT taken over…The Yankees lost that Battle in Florida. Deo Vindice. TY, Dear Southern Lady.

      Reply
  38. E Wid
    February 26, 2013 at 8:08 pm (2 years ago)

    I think you are mistaking the intro word-wse.
    Pespi=New Bern, North Carolina (which is not a northern state by any means.)Coca-Cola=Atlanta
    Also, it’s not “Pepsi” it’s “Pop”
    Coke/coc-cola… no… co-cola (in the south)

    Reply
    • Monica
      April 28, 2013 at 4:28 pm (2 years ago)

      I beg to differ I am born and raised in NC and I haven’t ever heard anyone say Pepsi it is always coke.

      Reply
      • Emily
        May 16, 2013 at 11:26 am (2 years ago)

        Haha no. I’m from NC and no one says “pop.”

        Reply
      • Christy
        June 2, 2013 at 7:12 pm (2 years ago)

        ERRNT wrong. Pepsi was INVENTED in NC and is boss. So most of us call’em pepsi or soda. Cocolas Georgia. Nonetheless NOONE gives a damn cause the drink of carolina IS SUNDROP!! FOR sure every dang body drinks the mess ‘cept me. I drink sweet tea.And No dang body ’round cheer says pop.

        Reply
    • julie
      June 1, 2013 at 3:30 pm (2 years ago)

      in eastern nc we LOVE our pepsi and ask for it by name. coke is fine , too. but in these parts pepsi is king

      Reply
  39. nathaniel blaze
    March 3, 2013 at 9:24 pm (2 years ago)

    For all yall talkein about whats north or not. Countrys a way of livin. Im from indiana abd i aint seen nobody more country then me. Brantley gilbert said it ” country must be country wide”

    Reply
    • Christy
      June 2, 2013 at 7:12 pm (2 years ago)

      AMEN.

      Reply
  40. Ken Buntin
    March 9, 2013 at 10:37 am (2 years ago)

    Used to be, southerners moved up north to get a better payin job. Now northerners have moved down south to get a job becus agh the guud payin jobs ar down south. Hear in Tennessee , this is the nu north. Northerners ar everwhare . Unions arnt strong down here and in most situations, there ain’t eny. Tennessee is the New North. But suthern hospitality is still hear. Yu kin always till a southerner , because they often spek ta strangers and ad very friendly. Peepl frum Texas ar tha saam waa.
    People frum Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama mostli stay thar becus home folk don’t leave home. Reel Mexikans whu ar native tu thar country don’t leav either. Only outcasts. Rebels, people who aren’t loyal to Mexico ar ones who leave for big muni in America.Tru native Asians, orientals, are same waa. They mite visit America cuple weeks, but will return to their native countries to live there. If they stay in America, they ar still family, but ar counted as outcasts to their family and ad treated differently with less respect.Becus thay ar leevin centuries of family cultures.

    Reply
    • Christy
      June 2, 2013 at 7:16 pm (2 years ago)

      C’mon ken. Are you fo REAL!? You can spell cultures but not to. Another southern sayin. You MUSTa been in pawpaws white lightnin.

      Reply
  41. Brian
    March 12, 2013 at 12:03 am (2 years ago)

    In some parts of south texas you need to learn about wambback (my best text render of the word)

    As in my daddy would say when I got to far from him, “Now you wamback here”

    The garbage men were wambacks, because they always said “wamback, come on now wamback”

    Reply
    • Hunni
      April 23, 2013 at 6:56 pm (2 years ago)

      Where is the ‘like’ button?

      Reply
    • Christy
      June 2, 2013 at 7:17 pm (2 years ago)

      Moneback in NC

      Reply
  42. Nikki
    March 21, 2013 at 3:52 pm (2 years ago)

    “Cut the light on” instead of “turn the light on” :)

    Reply
  43. Madison
    March 29, 2013 at 10:18 pm (2 years ago)

    Totally disagree most southernera prefer Pepsi over come any day

    Reply
  44. Lindsey
    April 10, 2013 at 9:04 pm (2 years ago)

    You know those little sticker things that get stuck on your clothes when you walk through the grass? (Most people call them Hitchhikers) We call them Beggarlice.

    Reply
    • Dovey
      May 8, 2013 at 3:15 pm (2 years ago)

      Yep, beggerlice it is. And something crooked, like a picture or a piece of furniture, was sigogglin’. As for ya’ll, it’s singular. All ya’ll is plural. We understand that yonder is over there, and yander is a little bit farther over there. As a child any soft drink was a ‘cocola’, an extension cord was a drop cord, fireflies were lightnin’ bugs, lunch was (and is) dinner, and the evenin’ meal is supper. We still go to prayer meetin’ on Wednesday nights, and yes, evenin’ starts just after noon, and night sets in right after sundown. We ask what in the cattywampus you’re on about, and we’re often discombobulated by a good many things. But when I see the sun rise over the Blue Ridge Mountains and the fog burns off the hills and hollers I’ve always call home I know there’s no where else I’d rather be.

      Reply
  45. Alice
    April 11, 2013 at 11:10 pm (2 years ago)

    My father was from Georgia and used to say finny instead of fixin’. I also remember some other relatives using this word, too. Does anyone else use this word?

    Reply
  46. Elizabeth
    April 18, 2013 at 8:13 pm (2 years ago)

    So question for y’all from the South. We are moving from very Northern WI, to GA. All the words you use or are saying, we use way up here! anywho, how bad do we “Northern’ers get judged for being from the North? We or at least we don’t Judge people from the south. Want to raise my children up right by being around people who are friendly, not always friendly around here. My sister has lived in TN the last 15 years, I grew up in N.IL. any suggestions?

    Reply
    • madi
      August 9, 2013 at 6:55 pm (1 year ago)

      Um…you might get shot. i wouldnt go around crowin like a rooster that yall’s a northerner. Just summin to chew over.

      Reply
  47. Jim
    April 26, 2013 at 2:15 pm (2 years ago)

    How ’bout this one….dagnapit! that was used a lot back in north Georgia where I grew up. A polite cuss word.

    Reply
  48. Denise
    April 28, 2013 at 4:33 pm (2 years ago)

    I’m from north central Georgia. Born, raised and lived here all my life. So have all my family. We LOVE sweet tea! We’ve never called a remote control a clicker or changer. We just call it a remote control or remote. We use the words ‘yonder’ and ‘reckon’ but what a lot of people don’t realize is that these two words were not made up by Southerners. They are English. Shakespeare used ‘yonder’, like in Romeo and Juliet. “What light through yonder window breaks” I’ve also heard many British people I’ve encountered say ‘reckon’. Don’t forget America started out as 13 British colonies so we were bound to pick up and still use some of their words. And a lot of folks here in the South, like me, probably have British ancestors. I even use the word ‘shall’ sometimes. Some words we Southerners may have made up ourselves. There are a lot of words mentioned above that I use or have heard, like caddywompus and dagnapit but some of them I’ve never heard. Ever heard of discombobulated (meaning confused or disorganized)? Or how about funktified? (meaning has turned funky, like spoiled milk) Here’s one my greatgrandfather would say “in a case of depushity,…”, meaning a difficult situation.

    Reply
  49. Branden Jew
    May 1, 2013 at 8:14 pm (2 years ago)

    Mayonnaise a lotta people in here!

    Reply
  50. Katie
    May 9, 2013 at 6:20 pm (2 years ago)

    Hell yeah, this sites right on the money. I live in Ga too, heard and say all them words put in that little essay thing. This is great made me laugh a little bit =]

    Reply
  51. Dean-Dillon
    May 10, 2013 at 9:54 am (2 years ago)

    My mama always say’s “Am Fixin’ up ya tea”

    Reply
  52. Alice
    May 10, 2013 at 6:34 pm (2 years ago)

    Why do a lot of Southerners say “thew” instead of “through”? Also, “salava” instead of “saliva”.

    Reply
  53. Shanda
    May 12, 2013 at 5:12 pm (2 years ago)

    I’ll add a few more.
    1. Kin–your family.
    2. Good Lord willin (no “G” and no apostrophe) and the creek don’t rise–As long as nothing comes up, this shouldn’t be a problem. Example: We’ll come see yall tomorrow, good Lord willin and the creek don’t rise.
    3. The devil’s beatin his wife–It’s raining, but the sun’s still shining.
    4. According to a friend of mine from up north, this is only said here… Do what?
    5. Washrag (it might also be said “warshrag”) has already been properly covered. :)
    6. I can’t believe noone has listed this one. No count…

    Reply
  54. Ette
    May 18, 2013 at 1:41 am (2 years ago)

    Where I was raised on the south shore of Massachusetts, we said “pocketbook” and dropped the g’s on our words. Just think it’s interestin’ is all!

    One thing I noticed in Louisiana is the way I hear some say umbrella – it’s UMbrella. And depending on who you’re talking to, they’ll be asking if you have any cheern, or churn, not children.

    And I’m sorry, but way to go people from the north for making us all look like snooty bastards, (not that perpetuating stereotypes about the south ["damn yanks"] is any better). I’ve met many an ignorant townies in Boston or in the suburbs in MA that match the supposed drama and ignorance found in the south, and certainly the accent plays no part of that mess.

    Reply
  55. Dena
    May 21, 2013 at 9:48 pm (2 years ago)

    ha! My parents are from the pee dee area of South Carolina, but I was raised in the suburbs of Atlanta and my southern accent was “corrected” by all my friends in school with Yankee Parents. Never fear, I can juggle both accents now- it’s nice, because I can be accepted into the Yankee crowd, but then I can rock the southern crowd too.
    My mom still busts out the phrase “I swony” (basically the genteel way of saying “I swear”) Anyone else say that?

    Reply
    • Ginger
      May 29, 2013 at 3:22 pm (2 years ago)

      Swan’s been covered, thanks.

      Reply
    • madi
      August 9, 2013 at 7:03 pm (1 year ago)

      Well, i’m from SC, but i dont say i swony.
      Well, im from charleston, and they say thing like bless you heart. Bless your heart actually means-and take it from a true souther belle- ‘ain’t he an’ idjit!’. BTW, I only like half of you, you half-damned half-yankee. To the southern side of yall, i say, ey bo.

      Reply
  56. Yeah right Cory
    May 31, 2013 at 6:37 pm (2 years ago)

    Cory the fact that you think Yankees are superior than Southern folk shows how uneducated your are. Also, I would love to see you “Knockout” a fraction of the Southerns I was rasied with. Another southern term “Corn-bread country strong”. As for Jersey girl im sorry you fill that way about the South hope you find your place somewhere else.

    Reply
  57. Toylah
    May 31, 2013 at 11:07 pm (2 years ago)

    A lot of this just sounds like Northern stereotypes. Well for those Southerners who don’t know we also have our Southern stereotypes. Like we’ll call them rednecks, hillbillies, or Confederates. Also we think that everyone from the south loves NASCAR

    Reply
    • madi
      August 9, 2013 at 7:08 pm (1 year ago)

      Im a redneck girl and damn proud of it. By the way, we say all damn yanks are idjits and need to actually go into Harvard instead of just parkin ther car in its yard.

      Reply
  58. Aimee Leigh
    June 3, 2013 at 9:08 pm (2 years ago)

    Oh my, where to start.. I am WV born and bred, gold and blue.

    Crick, waller, hollor, mator, tator, skift, this here, aiming to do that, bull hockey, reckon, bleeding like a stuck pig, the Good Book, mad as a hornet, doodley squat, polecat, mountain out of a molehill, knee-high to a grasshopper and on and on. Drop the g and add an r ;) Don’t they teach that along with i before e except after c?

    Just for an FYI…. if you don’t want us judging ya yanks, then please take note: The little banjo song implying something ugly about Appalachia that y’all like to emulate when I say where I am from – newsflash – Deliverence is based out of Georgia or SC y’all so stop already. That is my pet peeve with Yanks – well, that and always having to tell people that yes.. West Virginia is really a state, we split with VA in like 1863. Thanks for letting me get that off my chest. Whew.

    Oh I always say Bless your soul…

    Reply
    • JW
      August 13, 2013 at 10:13 am (1 year ago)

      This author also forgot “youns”. Not sure of the spelling but if you ever get to TN and work in a grocery store, they will ask if “youn’s got this?” Basically saying do yall have this. And I am with you on the state split. I am originally from South Dakota and it is a state. There is a North and South Dakota we are not “The Dakotas”. I moved to GA 13 years ago because I fell in love with the people and the Southern Hospitality but so many other people have moved down here since the Olympics that the Southern Hospitality is hard to find now. What is skift?

      Reply
  59. Kamilah
    June 6, 2013 at 1:50 am (2 years ago)

    I’m from NC (parents are from SC and GA, family roots go back to LA) just found out “the devil’s beatin his wife” is a specifically Southern term – I thought it was at least all over the east coast!

    And on the whole North/South animosity thing: I think it’s totally ridiculous that in 2013, people are still judging eachother on what area they were born in. I love the South, but I know there’s just as many ignorant folks down here as up there. For the Northerners though, who don’t get some of our hostility, like a lot of others said, it’s ridiculous how many people move from up North down here and make fun of our culture and ways. Not only that though, I lived in the North (back and forth from NYC and Baltimore, MD) for about 4 years and the amount of complete and utter CRAP you have to put up with from almost everyone you meet for being where you’re from is offensive and ridiculous. Having people mock my accent was a daily thing. And don’t get me started on when I said I was movin home (“why are you going back THERE?” “you finally got out of that place, why would you go back?!”… just RUDE. I never talked bad about the North to a Northerner, I don’t understand what makes so many of em think it’s okay to talk bad about our home to us.

    Reply
    • Ka oxidine
      June 30, 2013 at 3:06 pm (1 year ago)

      Please, this is not the place for your comment.

      Reply
    • madi
      August 9, 2013 at 7:12 pm (1 year ago)

      Uh…yeah. You aint a true southerner, and you need a good whuppin to knock some sense into ya. You give a bad name to the south, idjit.

      Reply
    • Pepper
      October 14, 2014 at 9:05 pm (2 months ago)

      Now, you are a southern lady. Whatever your family and education background (some equate academic education with intelligence, can be but not always), intelligent, clear eyed and humanistic. Thanks, I am reading this site for the first time and beginning to wonder about SOME of my southern sisters. A whole lot of hate and prejudice on both sides. Good people are good people no matter what their accent or where they live, the same for not so good. I guess I’m not as much of a lady as you, I would have had to given them a “Bless your heart, you are so rude and don’t even know it!!) LOL

      Reply
  60. virginiadave
    June 21, 2013 at 5:14 am (1 year ago)

    Ya done done it know
    You done pissed her off..
    Y’all done made me mad

    Reply
  61. Tyffani
    June 30, 2013 at 12:25 am (1 year ago)

    Born and raised in rural Alabama. I haven’t heard over half of these words until just now haha. Then again, these words come from many southern states. Not just the south east.

    Reply
  62. Ka oxidine
    June 30, 2013 at 3:05 pm (1 year ago)

    I grew up in East TN. When I was commissioned in the Army and went to officers’ training one thing we had to do was make a speech (which we wrote), present it, be videoed making the speech, and then be critiqued. The Senior Officers told me to NEVER lose the accent as people would pay attention to what I had to say. Course, I was a cute little whippersnapper gal too.

    Reply
  63. cj snyder
    August 5, 2013 at 9:16 pm (1 year ago)

    Has anyone heard “got your apron on backward” in the context of saying something as jest which is, sadly, true? Not sarcasm exactly ~ but not far off?

    Reply
  64. beach chic
    August 8, 2013 at 12:43 am (1 year ago)

    I moved to KY from PA but, before that I was born in CA and grew up there. So, I’m not a “Yankee”, but I still get a lot of “where y’all from”? The locals give me flack about leaving CA (technically not true)to live in KY, but it is worst to tell them I just moved here from PA. ASlso, I’ve been getting a lot of “oh, sorry ’bout that” and then they don’t fix what they were suppose to do. What’s up with that? Is this the “special” southern hospitality that we’ve all heard about? Snarky things said with a smile. . .the northeast has got nothing on this place!

    Reply
  65. Landon
    August 8, 2013 at 12:27 pm (1 year ago)

    I’m from Dayton,tx and our way of saying thank you is fuck you with something hard and sandpapery bitch!!!well for me and my cousins!

    Reply
  66. Jason
    August 8, 2013 at 1:36 pm (1 year ago)

    Hosepipe = Water hose. Like the one used to water your garden.
    Cut = To turn off. As in “Cut the lights.” or “Cut the engine.”
    Crank = To start. As in “Crank the engine.”
    Whatcha no good? Translates to “What do you know that’s good?” It’s actually a friendly saying. Like saying “How’s it goin’?”

    Reply
  67. JW
    August 13, 2013 at 9:19 am (1 year ago)

    Most of my friends down here are not from the South but there are a couple and they use ALL of these phrases. The South has become less and less “Southern” as more people from all over the USA move down here. Especially in the Metro area. Most restaurants now serve “unsweet tea” with packets of sugar. Personally I perfer my tea ice cold and strong with no sugar at all. Most places down here don’t know how to make a good sweet tea anymore. My neighbor is a born and raised Georgian and she makes some damn good sweet tea!

    Reply
  68. Southeast Missouri
    August 17, 2013 at 6:26 am (1 year ago)

    Walmarts not walmart. It’s like your going to all of em

    Reply
  69. Georgia boy
    August 18, 2013 at 10:03 pm (1 year ago)

    Well theres lots of folks down here in Georgia that have been invaded by the rich northerners and changed. Then ya got downtown Atlanta and you better have a gun on ya cause theres a good chance ya could get robbed. Places like buckhead where ya got 4 story houses on every corner. But I live right by the flint river and we say yall, I reckon, over yander, and its pacan not peecan and its just sad see in all the good southern culture go away

    Reply
    • Bill Lomey
      August 19, 2013 at 1:52 pm (1 year ago)

      The general IQ of the south has increased with migration from the west and north…. not gone down. Compare the inner burbs to yall’z in country bumkinland and yall’z will see whats I mean! Men in wife beaters, chewin’ tarbackee, bible-thumpin, science and math-hatin’ ignoramuses… SCARY!

      Reply
      • CSAGrandma
        November 8, 2013 at 10:04 pm (1 year ago)

        Yeah, it has changed alright, and has NOT for the better, Thank You Very Much. We will keep Thumping Our Bibles..IN GOD WE TRUST. AMEN. Guess you didn’t know Georgia leads the Nation in Yards that have The Ten Commandments in From of Them, (Signs).
        Now we have Gays in our Schools teaching our Children., that’s just plain wrong, ALL of You Politically Correct People, go back to where you came from.

        Oh, and By The Way. When do you ever hear of anyone Retiring and Moving North?

        Reply
      • southern mama
        May 9, 2014 at 9:36 pm (7 months ago)

        That shows your ignorance. We do not need you “yankees” of average (or below) intelligence migrating into the south to “raise IQ”scores. If you had any knowledge at all about the concept of IQ you would know that it is based upon a “normal distribution” or general variation among all people regardless of geographical location….unless you are making a racist remark and referring to the prevalence of people of African decent who are predominate in the south and an innate deficit in intellectual functioning.

        Reply
      • Carole
        September 28, 2014 at 11:27 pm (3 months ago)

        What does “yall’z” mean?

        Reply
    • CSAGrandma
      November 8, 2013 at 10:08 pm (1 year ago)

      Amen Georgia Boy! Atlanta is NOT a Southern City, never was. It was built by the Yankee Government, after 1864, called Reconstruction.
      My Family had Two Farms on The Flint River 1840′s. Awesome way of life, none to compare. I was fortunate to be raised that way. God Bless You.

      Reply
  70. "Damn Yankee"
    August 19, 2013 at 12:58 pm (1 year ago)

    I came across this page while looking up “southern sayings that are actually mean” because I saw something on pinterest about “bless your heart” being condescending. I asked my mom, who confirmed that people actually say that (she grew up in TX and moved up to MN after she graduated highschool 30 yrs ago). I expected to read about southern sayings, that I’d find interesting because we don’t say them up here (like how we say “pop”, “you guys” and “hot dish” here in MN), but what I didn’t expect was all of the hate on both sides in the comments. I have family in TX, MS, FL & SC and have been to all of them multiple times and have had generally good experiences. It boggles my mind that people would speak so hatefully about people they don’t know (I didn’t know I was a “damn yankee” or “idjit yankee” just because of the where I was born and raised). I don’t speak negatively about southerners, nor is it a common thing for me to hear.
    One thing I have noticed while traveling in the south is the racial tension, african americans behaved almost…warily/resentful towards me, no matter how friendly I was towards them. Up north things aren’t perfect in that department, but in general interactions are warm and much more comfortable. I guess tension is to be expected though in places that used to have slaves. It’s just disheartening to see all of this hate when we are all American afterall, and not that different.

    Reply
    • Pepper
      October 14, 2014 at 9:55 pm (2 months ago)

      Can’t speak for others, but “bless your/his/her heart” has different meanings in differenct circumstances. Condescendency, sarcasm, mediation of a negative comment or heartfelt compassion/sympathy, it depends on the intent of the speaker.

      As for racial tensions, the south has no monopoly on that, the United States for that matter nor of recent history. So called “racial tension”-there is only one race, homo sapiens-is everywhere along with countless other “tensions” and is much more complex than your explaination. This is the opinion of a 60 year old white woman, take it for what it is worth. Next time ask.

      Reply
  71. Pat
    August 25, 2013 at 12:02 pm (1 year ago)

    I’m from Maryland (born in the District), I say y’all, pocketbook and my favorite from my grandmother “Corned ham son of a biscuit eater!”

    Reply
  72. NatFlan
    September 5, 2013 at 3:11 am (1 year ago)

    “Well shit fire” usually follow’d w/ “save matches” by a second person.

    Reply
  73. NatFlan
    September 5, 2013 at 4:07 am (1 year ago)

    “Well shit fire” usually responded to w/”save matches” by second person.
    “Its rainin like pouring piss outva boot out dere”
    “Idunno” a.k.u.n.a. I don’t know
    “Before I jerk a knot in ur tail”
    “dont go think’n ya done got too big for ya own britches”
    “Dry’r'n a popcorn fart”
    “Cold’r'n a well diggers ass”
    “runnin round like a chicken w/its head cut off”
    “madder’n a wet hen”
    “dont kno ya ass from a hole in da ground”
    “all dat work and he done got plum tuck’r'd out”

    Reply
  74. jona
    September 5, 2013 at 12:18 pm (1 year ago)

    did we add “reckon”? i reckon i might do this/that.
    i reckon it’ll rain.

    “woulda been going…”
    If you’da made that turn there right on that turnpike you’da been goin back south. or some such.

    idk if we hold the monopoly on “ain’t” but we say it a lot down here in south georgia lol
    then again, i’m from atlanta, so some of these differ where i hail. now i live close to florida, but honestly the regional expressions are about the same, from what i can tell.

    Reply
  75. thomas
    September 6, 2013 at 11:42 am (1 year ago)

    This has got to be the stupidest thing I have ever seen I was born in the north and live in the south and all I have to say is we’re f#@#ing Americans! One nation under god stop bickering like children and grow up! There are more important things going on in this world. Why do you think the rest of the world makes fun of us!

    Reply
    • Pepper
      October 14, 2014 at 9:17 pm (2 months ago)

      Second that!!!!!!!

      Reply
  76. Savannah
    September 15, 2013 at 8:26 am (1 year ago)

    Here’s a couple of mean ones:
    Ugly as homemade sin. Or he’s so ugly they’d have to tie a pork chop around his neck to get the dog to play with him.

    Reply
  77. Gene
    October 3, 2013 at 12:06 pm (1 year ago)

    How many southerners you know who retire in yankeeland? Must be somethin’ purty good about the south!

    Reply
  78. Brandon Smith
    October 6, 2013 at 9:17 pm (1 year ago)

    Hi all my name is Brandon Smith. I’m from reisterstown maryland. I consider Maryland a southern state because we’re below the mason Dixon line. In Maryland it’s kinda a mixture of different accents. I don’t know if I’ve a southern accent or not I think it’s because I’m surrounded in my familiar surroundings with people of the same accent some of the above postings are things that I have said. I usually adress a group by saying you guys or you all I have in times used y’all. I say soda not pop I tend to say mother like mutter and at times like mud Der I say Baltimore like balda more maryland like marlin Baltimore county like Balda more Cow nee water wood er some examples. Darn auto correct

    Reply
  79. A southern Native.
    October 24, 2013 at 10:27 pm (1 year ago)

    I jus wanted ta pop in n say hi. Lmao. This is hilarious. Born in Louisiana n raised in Oklahoma. Ignorin all the bullhonkey thats written above me. Haha. Jus wanted to tell ya it was awesome to laugh at everyone. My family is country… so alotta da sayins I hear errday. But im native so am more use ta hearin rez talk. Again this was jusntoo damn funny to not comment on.

    Reply
  80. Braedyn
    October 26, 2013 at 3:29 pm (1 year ago)

    Ya I’ve heard dumber than a box a rocks in Washington state. We have coke and Pepsi up here. And coke is better. We make sweet tea with the sugar in it. And we call the remote control the flicker dicker in my house or just flicker. Fricker!

    Reply
  81. Mike
    October 28, 2013 at 8:46 am (1 year ago)

    YONDER: Damn Yankees always got sumin to say when grown folks talking. Yall gone back over “YONDER” and git before I come up off this porch now!

    -Sorry I couldn’t resist! LMAO!

    Reply
  82. Savannah Transplant
    November 16, 2013 at 4:02 pm (1 year ago)

    I’m from Chicago and we’re being moved to Savannah. I don’t want to sound like an outsider idiot, so what are some easy ways to integrate myself in without looking like I’m trying too hard?

    Reply
  83. TS0601
    November 19, 2013 at 5:19 am (1 year ago)

    Let me get in here! After reading many of these comments I feel compelled to share my thoughts and experience.
    I’m a native Tennessean with roots in Alabama too. Definitely, I have Southern roots. Yes I capitalize the words Southern and South. Cannot seem to help myself on that!
    Firstly, I spent most of my life in Tennessee, then four years in Texas, and in 2000 I moved to New Hampshire. Now, I think we can all agree that it doesn’t get much more North than New Hampshire.
    True Yankees live here and I don’t mean that in a derogatory way. It’s a term of endearment, practically, here.
    That’s okay.
    Something important to note is that when I moved here I did NOT expect it to be like the South (and mostly it is not) but we are all human and I was surprised about many things, MANY things.
    Hunting, fishing, missing teeth, hicks, rednecks, weird dialects … all exist here too. The South does not have exclusivity on any of these. The South has its own BRAND of these … just as New England and other areas of the country do.
    Likewise, there are many sophisticated aspects to the South and Southerners (as there are to New England and the North.) I think Southerners, however, don’t emphasize this as part of their identity or heritage. I’m not sure why but I do know it’s cultural.
    Great people exist in all these places. Explore them and accept them as they are.
    Don’t visit or move to any other region and expect to change people. Observe and blend in … as much as possible.
    If “Yankees” have one fault, one major fault, it is this: “that’s not how we do it!!! and that’s not how you say it!!! and that’s not correct!!!” Well, you can bet when I moved up here I didn’t (and don’t) say that to people. I’d consider it rude. you know “when in Rome does as the Romans do …”
    Now, that doesn’t mean I disown or devalue my Southern heritage (of which I am proud … just because I can be.) I make the best Southern homemade buttermilk biscuits you ever tasted directly from my Mother’s recipe. But I just share ‘em … I promote ‘em. Then, I try the clam chowder. It’s delicious! See? It’s just more fun if we place nice together. And … as for that war of 150 years ago. It’s over and done. Let’s move on y’all! ;o)

    Reply
    • TS0601
      November 19, 2013 at 5:22 am (1 year ago)

      typos: * “when in Rome DO as the Romans do”
      and “It’s just more fun if we PLAY nice together.”

      Reply
  84. Rudy
    November 20, 2013 at 3:39 pm (1 year ago)

    One of my family favorites is “ugly as homemade sin,” basically a way of saying someone looks inbred.

    My grandfather, who’s 76, said his mother used to say “I’ll slap you from here to Halifax [meaning Canada]!” when he misbehaved as a child.

    And the Elizabethan word “yonder.” My grandparents still use this word, and I think it’s cool that we still use words in the South that you can only find written in Shakespeare and Faulkner novels!

    Reply
  85. Stephne
    November 22, 2013 at 9:21 am (1 year ago)

    To the tards who think southerners say pop. Ur idiots. If i hear someone say pop the first thing i think is u dang yankee! Dont come tellin the southern beauties what we say! Bless ur hearts

    Reply
  86. Petunia
    November 30, 2013 at 2:07 am (1 year ago)

    Before the Civil War Natchez, Mississippi had more millionaires than any other place in the country. We have more former Miss Americas….you can’t beat a southern belle, you will NEVER see a homely Miss Mississippi….and we have produced some of the most incredibly talented writers, musicians, poets, chefs(cooks;) and artists than anywhere else in the country and we love our Manning family, Jimmy Buffett, Elvis and William Faulkner, Levon Helm, The Allman Brothers, Eudora Welty and so on and so on, we are simply a very proud people….and we are not ashamed of our slang words, so Namaste y’all ;)

    Reply
  87. Petunia
    December 2, 2013 at 3:27 pm (1 year ago)

    I am from Alabama, I for one do not say clicker or changer. It is called a remote. I also do not call all sodas coke. I call them by their name such as sprite, dr. pepper, etc. What is this word: Lagniappe. I have never heard that. I call a purse a purse. Don’t make assumptions y’all, and bless your heart. Have a good day sugar plum.

    Reply
  88. Jeremy
    December 4, 2013 at 6:03 pm (1 year ago)

    Down in Georgia, when some people refer to something not happening for “a minute”, it usually means “quite awhile” or “a long-ass time”.

    Reply
  89. AliBtoSC2014
    December 8, 2013 at 7:05 am (1 year ago)

    Hi everyone! I have a few questions… My fiance and I are moving to SC from NJ this August. He’s a wounded combat veteran so we were looking to move somewhere warm, friendly, welcoming to veterans, and close to family. We decided on Charleston, SC. After reading all the posts I got the impression that if we are polite and respectful, we will be fine. My concern is this: My fiance has been rejected by everyone he knew up here (family included) because he came back “different”. There is not a lot of support for veterans and the military. What are the chances that he will be made to feel unwelcome just because he’s form NJ? We are looking forward to getting away from the self-centeredness and rudeness up here. There is very little sense of community and helping someone is rare. Honestly, what do we need to know? I don’t want to seem rude just because of where I grew up not giving me the same cultural manners as our new home… Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hay
      January 7, 2014 at 3:22 pm (12 months ago)

      Best I can tell you, get plugged into a good church. Be friendly, help others, be a part of your new community, and just be laid back & let it come naturally.

      Reply
    • Jan
      June 28, 2014 at 4:49 pm (6 months ago)

      Finding a good church is excellent advice. Just be yourself and you’ll make friends – but they’re more likely to be other transplanted Yankees than Southerners. I’ve lived in NC (from PA) since 1999 and most of the locals already have life-long friends and don’t seem to be interested in making any more. Not that they’re mean or unfriendly, they’re just probably not going to invite you over for sweet tea any time soon. Don’t get too discouraged by most of these posts. I think they’re mostly kidding. Mostly.

      Reply
    • Pepper
      October 14, 2014 at 10:07 pm (2 months ago)

      Charleston has a long history with the military. Many Navy and Air Force personel are retired around the area. The South has a tradition of military service as well. If you have not moved yet or are now there, get in touch with veteran groups or organizations, they can give you lots of support and suggestions. Good luck and thank you and your husband for your service.

      Reply
  90. nick
    December 10, 2013 at 7:47 pm (1 year ago)

    in northern louisiana all of that is true except for saying sweeper, yankee, and clicker. we say vaccum cleaner, someone from up north, and remote

    Reply
  91. Caleb
    December 10, 2013 at 10:30 pm (1 year ago)

    Say you’re from the north then go down south and stay there and adopt the southern culture and all that what would you be considered.

    Reply
  92. Wouldn't live anywhere else
    December 12, 2013 at 9:01 am (1 year ago)

    We say POKE instead of bag. If something is rare we say it is SCARCE AS HEN’S TEETH. Also, from all of the yankee posts here I would ask you, If the south is so bad why is all the migration from north TO south instead of the other way around? I don’t see a flood of people wanting to move north.

    Reply
  93. ash
    December 18, 2013 at 12:34 pm (1 year ago)

    Ya ya. Us rebels may not sound to educated but u bet ur ass we dont try to be nothing more than who we are. I mean. When do rebels ever go up north to retire or vacation? XD fuck yanekees

    Reply
  94. Delware Deb
    December 18, 2013 at 10:10 pm (1 year ago)

    Just because we talk slow… doesn’t mean we are!!!
    I was born in the South and raised in both the North and South. I grew up with Southern Traditions and Manners!! When I’m in the North, I’m called a hillbilly, and when I’m in the South, I’m called a cityslicker!!

    btw… Coca~Cola and RC Cola are the only two cola worth drinking!!! Ice Tea should be so sweet your teeth hurt!!! People in the North, get off your lazy butts and make the simple syrup and sweeten the tea right!!! Sugar packets are for sissies!!!! Unsweetened tea should be illegal!!!

    Reply
  95. Emy _canada
    December 19, 2013 at 2:39 am (1 year ago)

    The level of ignorance in every single comment from a southerner on this page is extremely astounding. It wouldn’t surprise me did the whole reason the US was 14th in education was single handedly abused by you sideways thinking, fact warping, bigoted and delusional assholes. Hey south, I’ve lived in you since I was three, and I can honesty say you can go fuck yourselves. You’re dumb as shit, you’re discriminatory, and you have no respect for people outside of your realm of self proclaimed morality and unjustifiably hatefule and completely backwards religion. I hate to prognosticate, but I would garentee that most if not all of you had no idea what I just said. #prochoice
    suck my dick

    Reply
    • southern mama
      May 9, 2014 at 9:46 pm (7 months ago)

      OK dumb ass…go up north to live in an area that your obviously low class, uneducated self can afford and see how well you are treated there.

      Reply
  96. Bless Your Heart!
    December 23, 2013 at 11:08 am (12 months ago)

    I’m from CA, originally Yankee stock, and my wife is from Memphis. Naturally, I’ve then learned to appreciate much about the South, especially what I call “the Code”. Along with “Bless your heart”, one of my faves is “How nice!”. Quite a civilized way to tell someone off and they’ll smile, if they don’t know the Code.

    Reply
  97. sherri
    January 2, 2014 at 5:55 pm (12 months ago)

    I live in Ohio. And I say “buggy” everyone here tells at me because I say that rather than a cart. I also say sweeper, rather than a vacuum. I’m not southern, but I would love to visit. After reading all these posts, not sure if it would be safe for me to speak lol. I don’t hate southerners at all. I hate the fact that I even used that word. I love the accents, I love the family oriented culture, and slower way of living. Besides all of that, it’s a he’ll of a lot warmer :) I can’t wait to experience it for the first time this coming April. I promise I won’t “change your ways”, that’s just non-sense. I know northerners, have a bad rap in the south, but I hope my family will have a great time. We’re not all judgemental, or assholes….. :)
    Sincerely,
    Friend up north

    Reply
  98. Hay
    January 7, 2014 at 4:00 pm (12 months ago)

    My grandma would say
    “I declare” in disbelief
    “Oh my lans!” When surprised or overwhelmed.
    My great grandpa would say he’d do something “dreckly” (directly) to get the wife off his back
    I always liked
    “Uglier’n a mud fence”
    “Uglier’n homemade soap”
    Folks don’t get beat, they get “skint up”
    And kids all seem to have tails:
    “I’m gonna beat yore tail”
    “..tail over here, tail in gear”, etc

    Reply
  99. Your MuM
    January 7, 2014 at 5:38 pm (12 months ago)

    FIRST OF ALL THIS WEBSITE IS FAKE!! WE (YANKEES) HAVE COKE IN EVERY SINGLE DRIVE THRU UP HERE. THERE IS EVEN COKE IN THE RESTAURANTS. AND WE ARE NOT LAZY. WE ACTUALLY WORK FOR OUR MONEY. WE SAY BLESS YOUR HEART DOWN EHRE TOO!! SO BEFORE YOU GO DISSING YANKEES AND MAKE A WEBSITE ABOUT THIS LEARN YOUR FACTS FIRST!!!

    Reply
  100. Linn
    January 21, 2014 at 2:26 pm (11 months ago)

    I came here out of curiosity and wound up reading so much nonsense. The article was interesting to say the least! Although I’m from PA- bordering WV, but still- and say most of these things (I also ask for Coke and get stuck with a Pepsi, and I always make my sweet tea for real, none of that packet foolishness!). I guess I just wondered how I wound up with such Southern sayings in such a Northern (albeit out in the sticks, but still) area. Anyway. I guess I just don’t get why y’all are fighting over this. We’re all part of the same great country. Let’s act like adults.

    Reply
  101. Dee
    January 24, 2014 at 12:49 pm (11 months ago)

    We say, Dang it, a lot. Over yonder, fixin to, Bless your heart, Pop, for Coke or Pepsi etc., I declare. Tators, and many, many more.

    Reply
  102. June
    January 26, 2014 at 11:53 am (11 months ago)

    I find reading these posts very sad. I was born and raised in SC. We moved a LOT between Charleston and Greenville. As an adult, I lived a year in Europe. No one could believe I was from the South. I do use few southern terms and do not have a strong accent. Most place me from Boston. I don’t define myself in one way or another. I am proud of the growth of our state. I am proud of the strides we’ve made. I’ve seen racism from others who’ve moved here. I’ve also seen it in Europe and hear of it on the national and international news in other places. Unfortunately, racism goes many ways. It is not confined to southern states. We are a country of differences. Southerners against Northerners, races against races(all races), high class against low, etc. Most don’t embrace those differences. They’re too busy trying to prove they’re right or the other is wrong. I also find it sad that so many people who move to or visit the south are so pre-dispositioned that they can’t enjoy or find the good because they do not look for the good. I’m sure it goes the other way as well. I’ve only lived here and of course have only seen the prejudice against the south and southerners. They take our southern hospitality as fake and therefore they cannot enjoy it for what it is…just that…southern hospitality. I am sorry that they are that way. Once here with an open mind, there’s a LOT to enjoy. I am from here and don’t feel comfortable everywhere. Yes, there are cliques and groups but no place is utopia. I am on here to research names for a new business. Reading these posts just made me sad for those who are so hateful and close minded. So my search continues. You will probably find grammar problems in my post and may disagree with some (or all) things I’ve stated. I hope you’ll just take away one thought…none of us are perfect but if we just look for the positive and not expect negative, we would have a much better world! Have a great day!

    Reply
  103. Deemic
    January 28, 2014 at 9:17 pm (11 months ago)

    I’m the biggest Skynyrd fan in Minnesota, I ride a Harley and drink Jack Daniels. Pretty sure I out southern most southerners.

    Reply
  104. amanda
    February 12, 2014 at 9:03 pm (10 months ago)

    yankees need to stop messing with us south is better so yall damn yankies need to shut up south rules

    Reply
  105. kent
    February 22, 2014 at 1:38 pm (10 months ago)

    not worth three rolls of rat shit

    Reply
  106. Rachel
    February 27, 2014 at 2:06 pm (10 months ago)

    just so you know I’m from Pittsburgh and we say sweeper and buggy all the time and I’ve never heard anyone else call it that

    Reply
  107. Justin
    February 27, 2014 at 10:04 pm (10 months ago)

    I was born in southeast Michigan, technically a Yankee. Let me tell y’all something, I hate it up here. I resent the stereotype pretentious yankees, who’ll look down their noses for you drawling your o verbs. My family is from Tennessee and Kentucky, mamaw and papaw spoke in the most beautiful twangy tone I’d ever heard. I go down to visit frequently, and still listen to Patsy Cline and Hank Williams. Northerners can’t stand it, they call it “hillbilly music”. It was what I grew up on, I can’t change it. Wasn’t till I was 13 when I realized I talked different. The Yankee kids pronounce words the darnedest ways possible, they say “loyer” when it is even said in the spelling that it is pronounced “LAW-yer.” Same with wash, they used to pick at me for my sayin “warsh”. I had 3 uncles and a grandpap that died for the Confederacy, and my Rebel flag flaps in the wind gracefully. My mamaw swears that we are related to sissy spacek, which we obviously aren’t, it’s apparently a southern thing. She grew up in the same town as the Judds, Ashland Kentucky. I’m fixin to move to Tennessee with my family as soon as I graduate high school. The south is my homeland;beautiful, cultural, and damn does the air smell better than the industrial bullshit and not to mention the blasphemist northerners up here. I’m sure some of y’all can relate, even though I was sadly born in Yankee land, I am a southerner at heart tried and true. And for any yanks reading this callin me a betrayer or some bull, we will rise again, and this time we will win.

    Reply
    • Carole
      September 28, 2014 at 11:52 pm (3 months ago)

      Well, Justin, your mamaw and papaw are Southerners, so you have a foot in. If your heart is in Dixie, you might just as well bring the rest of you on down, too. And, welcome back. My son has told me that he never wants to live anywhere but here in Alabama.

      Reply
  108. Teeny
    February 28, 2014 at 4:24 pm (10 months ago)

    Comment

    Reply
  109. Teeny
    February 28, 2014 at 4:38 pm (10 months ago)

    Born in AL, raised in TX. Wall eyed hissy fit and pitchin’ a conniption were familiar phrases. We were always “fixin’ to” do something. When asking for a coke we had to clarify what kind of coke (Sprite, Dr. Pepper, etc.) and our pets were often uglier than a mud fence. We were always told not to forget our grinds and lockets, usually in reference to bathing, and I still have no idea what those are. I reckon, be there directly and shake your tail were familiar as well. Terms of endearment are Sugar, Sugar Pie, Honey Pie, Sweetpea and Booger. Something could “tump” over (tip or fall), a mess of any variety could be referred to as “kyharn”, though the spelling could be suspect. Interestingly, a friend from South Carolina used the word “cukkor” to mean the same thing as kyharn. When someone was of a bad temper he was “ill” and if feeling poorly was “stove up” or even “all stove up” and if one overindulged at the table was “full as a tick”. In our neck of the woods, “bless your heart (or little heart)” meant that we know you mean well, but….And to touch on one vulgarism, males fart but females poot. Enough said for now.

    Reply
    • dick church
      April 2, 2014 at 6:02 am (9 months ago)

      female gas is a fluffy

      Reply
  110. Teeny
    February 28, 2014 at 4:47 pm (10 months ago)

    The Kyharn mess should not be confused with a “mess” of anything, as a quantity. We would fix a mess of peas, collards, etc., meaning enough for a meal, a lot or some undefined quantity. Also, favorite expression of my mother: “Hell fire and damnation”. A person who was not quite right was “touched” but pronounced “tetched” or crazier than a coot.

    Reply
  111. Teeny
    February 28, 2014 at 4:53 pm (10 months ago)

    Amen June, amen. In the south we offered funeral cake, funeral casserole, etc. in times of loss. I know traditions spread as people move around and we are, after all, more alike than different in most things.

    Reply
  112. BG
    March 11, 2014 at 8:27 pm (9 months ago)

    Over Yonder- Over There
    I Reckon- I think
    Like a Lump on a Pickle- Lazy person who sits around all day!

    I’m from Georgia and grew up in Munford Alabama(a farm town look it up!)

    Reply
    • dick church
      April 2, 2014 at 6:30 am (9 months ago)

      You grew up in Bama? Bless your heart. Are you a Barner or a Bammer?

      Reply
  113. ken
    March 17, 2014 at 5:52 am (9 months ago)

    here in the south we say ZACKLY; YOUR BREATH SMELLS ZACKLY LIKE YOUR ASS.

    Reply
  114. Pride111
    March 19, 2014 at 8:31 am (9 months ago)

    Southerners….garbage !

    Reply
  115. New England
    March 22, 2014 at 10:33 pm (9 months ago)

    First off, its the other way around. Southerners blend the sugar into the tea because they are too lazy to open a small sugar packet (workout, I know right!). You’re even to lazy to say “you all” instead of “Y’all”. A buggy drives on the road and occasionally gets smashed by a foot. The CART you use for shopping, is called a SHOPPING CART which actually makes sense. And if you hadn’t forgotten, the North creamed, whipped, mashed, crushed, (whatever you want to say) “y’all” in the Civil War.

    Reply
    • dick church
      April 2, 2014 at 6:36 am (9 months ago)

      Yeah. I’m sure it has nothing to do with the former [massive] sugar and tea plantations. Apparently, you were TOO lazy for grammar. Sans Souci. There’s no need for it South of the line.

      Reply
  116. Southern
    March 24, 2014 at 10:22 pm (9 months ago)

    Let’s see a few terms I love from my heritage:
    1. Well Bless (shake head)…. Just bless. This is when something is so off the wall or sad in what you see, you can not even come up with words to express.
    2. Ville…. In a name of a town the v is heard, the illegal is kind of all lumped together… Like Abbeville..the ll is not heard it is abbviule ( is more what it sounds like)
    3. well butter my bisquet and call it done
    4. Oooohhhh girl, she is about to have a hissy fit
    5. Southern Sunday lunch is a weekly function to attend. Those whom are not ther know they will be topic of gossip OR receive phone calls to find out 1. Who died 2. Who is sick 3. You BETTER be ther next week, our the guilt trip will triple.
    6. College football is very serious, it can divide a household for months.
    7. Just because the women talk sweetly, do NOT mistake this for that they are dumb or not strong women. We like our men to treat us ladies, and know our worth that our Daddy’s taught us how to take care of ourselves.
    8. A mess is not clutter in the house, but a group of vegetables to cook
    9. Dag nab it…
    10. Case Quarter, a real quater and not other change to make up 25 cents.
    11. Waving while you are enjoying time on your porch is acceptable behavior, even to strangers.
    12. Smiling and talking to someone while you are in line is also acceptable, one never knows when a stranger will become a friend.
    13. Polite is never out of style
    14. You still write thank you notes…. For all gifts. It shows them the respect if they took the time to think of you, you show them the same in return. Also, your mom will haunt you…even if she is living….if you do not.
    15. That brings me to the end do my southern charm by saying, now come on by and sit a spell ye here?

    Reply
  117. ChrystAl
    March 30, 2014 at 4:19 pm (9 months ago)

    I love the north and the south , I live in the south but have lived in the north the first half of my life . Up north we call everything coke as well , we love cola cola and not so much Pepsi . The ice tea thing is northern people drink unsweetened tea so that’s why the sugar is on the side . I love saying ya all . We use pocketbook up north too . Some if these words are a matter of history and not area . I love reading posts on slang words .

    Reply
  118. Zach
    April 12, 2014 at 8:52 pm (8 months ago)

    I like to (here in Alabama the heart of Dixie)we like to say yonder whether it’s ’round the corner or another state we say it all the time

    Reply
    • TA
      April 23, 2014 at 10:21 pm (8 months ago)

      I always enjoy talking to people about old sayings and such from the south or north. Has anyone found any good books on old sayings? Southern or otherwise?

      Reply
  119. Danny
    April 20, 2014 at 1:06 am (8 months ago)

    I live in jersey soo I’m a true Yankee … And we use your dumber then a box of rocks , but remote , gargabe not trash , you guys not y’all and fixin I’m never fixing anything Yankees be buying lol but I would like to visit the south … Imagine a Italian from new York in the south …

    Reply
  120. Eric
    May 5, 2014 at 9:11 pm (8 months ago)

    I’ve lived in the South, the Northeast, the Mid-Atlantic, and the Midwest. I’ve met good and bad in everyone of those regions. However, I will say this, and I don’t want to generalize all Southerners, but a good portion of Southerners are some of the most two-faced, back-stabbing, phonies on the planet. They treat fellow Southerners this way, as well as “Yankees,” BTW, my relatives are all from Georgia, as well as my parents. My parents were the ones who educated me on the faux myth of “Southern hospitality.” A lot of Southerners have a bad habit of giving lip service for things they have no intention of doing, an example would be, “come on over sometimes for dinner,” and yet they have no intention of ever actually inviting you to their house for dinner. Southerners are also infamous for operating shady businesses and ripping people off. I’m basing all these things on real life experiences, I’ve lived in the South for a total of 27 years of my 53 years, so I’m not just making blank statements. I would trust a “Yankee” any day of the week over the average Southerner. And I’m certainly not saying that all “Yankees” are trustworthy either, I lived in NYC and Baltimore(if you want to classify Baltimore as Yankee land) and have lived in South Florida with plenty of “Yankees.” Believe me, I’ve met several scumbag “Yankees.” But Southerners are as a whole, the least trustworthy, two-face, talk behind your back gossiping, busybodies, of all the regions I’ve lived in. Have to admit I have met some real decent Southern folk, who are indeed the salt of the earth, but I’ve met a lot more who fit into the former category.

    Reply
  121. Anna
    May 25, 2014 at 2:37 pm (7 months ago)

    I was raised in southern LA about an hour southwest of nola and am crackin’ up at the truths of the majority of these. I know people from here and from “down the bayou” (Dulac, Chauvin, Montegut, Point-aux-Chenes etc) who consider north Louisianaians “yankees”. My family’s from Bossier City and I do notice a difference in the vernacular- my parents say ‘remote’ but most people down here do say ‘the clicker’. I remember being peeved about that as a child, along with saying ‘coo-pon’ instead of ‘queue-pon’ for coupon. In fourth grade my teacher started talking about a ‘coo-pon’ for something and I began cracking up laughing, thinking that she had a glitch in her speech.

    Other things:
    ‘make a grocery bill’- going to the store
    ‘the icebox’- the refrigerator
    ‘the hosepipe’- the waterhose
    ‘down the bayou’ ‘up the bayou’- Not in reference to going down there and then coming back, but two separate locations. Any time I ask which is where, I get no straight answers. I pretty much call anything more south in any direction from where I am ‘down the bayou’.

    Reply
  122. SouthQ
    May 29, 2014 at 4:25 pm (7 months ago)

    I lived in the south for years, and I heard people say “your alls”. For example, Is this your alls book? How is your alls day going?
    Like when talking to more than 1 person. Is this southern? I heard it so many times, I started saying it too. I stopped saying it since I don’t live in the south anymore, and I don’t hear it here in the north.

    Reply
  123. Betty sue
    June 25, 2014 at 10:01 pm (6 months ago)

    Im from the finest state in the US of A,kentucky we say well i declare or yall and drank sweet tea im a southren belle and we u mono grams and us cheveron a lot!!!

    Reply
  124. Bamagirl
    July 6, 2014 at 8:44 pm (6 months ago)

    Down in Alabama we say “Well, he’s dumber than a bag o’ hammers.”

    Reply
  125. Mark Hunt
    July 22, 2014 at 12:57 am (5 months ago)

    How bout we secede again and kick some yankee ass. I was just visitin the north in baltimore and everywhere I went people made fun of the way I said things. Like buggy, clicker, ice, and whenever I asked for tea they never gave me sweet. You can’t even get any decent catfish an grits up there. The South must Secede again. Down with the North.

    Reply
  126. Bobby Joe
    August 6, 2014 at 3:47 pm (5 months ago)

    How about “carry” instead of “drive” or “take” or whatever else might be used, as in “I’m fixin to carry Mama to the store”. My first wife could not abide my “Suthen dilec”, she thought it made me sound ignorant, or “ignert” as my Daddy would say.
    Well I think a lot of people get dialect confused with intelligence, and ever who thanks that a-way is lible to look mighty damn stupid when I start rattlin off enough hunerd dollar words to fill up my Mama’s big ol’ pocketbook. Then I might detail the fallacy of relying on prejudices and uninformed stereotypes to categorize any human being or their culture. Top it off with a big ol’ Suthen Grin and a bole of grits and I’ll be Diddley Damned if that ain’t a good day!

    Reply
  127. Carole
    September 28, 2014 at 11:16 pm (3 months ago)

    How about “Mamanem”. “Y’all goin” over to Mamanem’s?” We are going to visit whoever is at home, Mama, Daddy, etc.

    Reply
  128. ME
    October 11, 2014 at 2:12 am (2 months ago)

    For the “bitchy Southern woman,” you forgot something infinitely worse than “bless your heart.” Mind you, I say this as a Christian…but unfortunately the worst thing you can possibly hear from a Southern woman is an overly syrupy-sweet “I’ll pray for you.” OOOOOOOHHHHHH shut up!

    Reply
  129. LISA
    October 22, 2014 at 2:40 am (2 months ago)

    I know my friend from Kentucky always made up words because of her lack of a good education. For example when she flew out to Cali, she couldn’t remember the word turbulence so she said “we were turbulating the whole way” :) Always cracked me up.

    Reply
  130. Harley
    October 25, 2014 at 10:57 pm (2 months ago)

    Hi, how can I say, “we need to talk or I need to talk to you about something serious” in one southern word .I know there’s one word for it but I can’t recall it. You can say this word while mad at someone, or you have been waiting for a good time to talk

    HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  131. Katelyn
    November 19, 2014 at 12:46 pm (1 month ago)

    As a student at UGA who comes from a small, central Georgia town, I have been blown away by the number of people north of me (even in Georgia) who do not know what a “gem clip” is. In case you were wondering, it’s equivalent to a paper clip. Google it. It comes up.

    Reply
  132. Name
    November 19, 2014 at 10:10 pm (1 month ago)

    Thank y’all
    The love of my life is from GA

    She warned me I have to larn a new way of talking – if y’all would publish a complete Southernisms Vocabulary y’all would help us other folk, fit in.

    Reply
  133. So-Called "Southerner"
    November 20, 2014 at 12:21 am (1 month ago)

    I live in the south, and my family and I have always made a point out of speaking and communicating with PROPER grammar and enunciating and pronouncing our words correctly so we do not sound like poorly educated country hicks. The unfortunate and embarrassing dialect of the south alone is enough to make us move back to New York, where my great grandfather and great grandmother lived before moving to Texas (unfortunately) in their thirties. And, even though they did increase their fortune by moving, they still could have been just as wealthy by now if they had just stayed in their Upper East Side brownstones. But, anyway, sounding like an intelligent idiot is not something to be proud of, and the only reason I’m looking at this idiotic and misguided page is because of an assignment I am doing for my Human Geography class at my private school. This is just sad, and it is even more sad that you people are “proud” of your dialect.

    Reply
  134. Kevin
    March 26, 2014 at 9:16 pm (9 months ago)

    I don’t talk southern and don’t act it either but from what I been reading there is a lack of respect with some on here, not all but some I’m from the north and I can tell you there are good and bad everywhere. I like a lot of people from the south and my best friend lives in the south but to you all that don’t like Yankees just because they live north makes you ignorant. when we see southern people here we welcome them and are friendly. We don’t hate on them just because of where they live so grow up haters and stop trying to fight a war that you lost long ago. We are all Americans now one country under God. Try to remember that.

    Reply
  135. dick church
    April 2, 2014 at 6:00 am (9 months ago)

    Yup. There are several cases of hyper-intelligent people choosing not to leave the South. Every individual I can think of died of alcoholism though. :(

    Reply
  136. Rebecca
    April 15, 2014 at 9:37 pm (8 months ago)

    thank you

    Reply
  137. Abby
    June 5, 2014 at 12:49 am (7 months ago)

    Thank you! It’s not being from the south or north that makes a person ignorant. Some of these people are actually trying to have a fight from behind computer screen and are calling other people ignorant? LOL This forum was supposed to be about what Southerners say and it’s sad that if people that aren’t educated read this that all southerners hate “damn Yankees” because why? Oh they’re from the north -_- Just so everyone knows not all southerners are like this because I have been raised in the south my whole life. The truth is is that probably over half of the people that you hear yelling something negative about the Yankees or the north haven’t even been there. They probably don’t even know what it’s like to be outside of their state, much less a different region of the United States.

    Reply

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